Replied to Supporting Digital Practice – making time-for-learning by dave dave (davecormier.com)
Digital practices need to be negotiated, they need to be talked about out loud in ways that many of our 20th century practices don’t.
I really like your point about negotiation Dave. It reminds me in part of Doug Belshaw’s work on digital literacies. In my current role, the team I am in is responsible for supporting schools with Google. Having to cover a wide range of contexts and content, we often meet in the middle at some sort of imaginary average. I question how much people therefore get from these sessions. What I like about the option of online courses is that you can at least complete them as a staff group, reflecting together from your own perspective.

One take-away from the recent #EngageMOOC was that such negotiation and dialogue needs to happen at multiple levels. I think sometimes this is the challenge. We might generate conversation at the classroom, but it is not being had at the school level, something you touched upon in a past post. Also, the link between institutions and education systems seems stretched at times with the current neoliberal obsession with realism and the way it is.

Replied to Let’s break 2 molds that hurt everyone’s wellbeing (EDUWELLS)
In 1980 the average Auckland house price was the same as ONE Auckland Teacher salary. In 2018, it is the equivalent of NINE Auckland teacher salaries.
I like your point Richard of looking at wellbeing from a systemic point-of-view. I just finished reading a report on teachers in West Virginia living from paycheck to paycheck. What stood out was the attempts to link bonuses with exercise. We want impact and effect sizes, but are happy to ignore equity because it is beyond our control.
Replied to Enabling two way communication with WordPress and GitHub for Issues by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
This week, using the magic of open web standards, I was able to write an issue post on my own website, automatically syndicate a copy of it to GitHub, and later automatically receive a reply to the copy on GitHub back to my original post as a comment there. This gives my personal website a means of ...
Chris I love the methodical approach you provide here. As I read it allows me to easily identify what I have already done or still need to do. My only hiccup is Bridgy Publish.

Everything that I have read seems to state that this is easy or seemingly obvious. I registered with Bridgy years ago. I then had issues attaching accounts to Bridgy Publish.

I probobly should document this properly. Always thought that it was me, so turned to other plugins, such as IndieWeb and SNAP.

Replied to Cows of the Future by Tom Barrett (Dialogic Learning Weekly #71)
Think of a topic outside of school that you have a deep understanding of. What are the signals that indicate you have a deep knowledge and understanding of that topic?
I find the idea of ‘deep Learning’ fascinating. I feel that deep learning is often when you know that you don’t know. Often when you start out on a new topic you get a little bit of knowledge and you think that you know it. However, this is not deep until you dig down and get to the point where you realise you can’t know and that your knowledge will always be limited.

Take for example my recent deep dive into Global2. I have worked with, written about and presented on WordPress. However the further I went the more I realised that there were so many nuances that I had never considered. This has been taken to a whole new level with my wonderings about the #IndieWeb.

I therefore find Fullan’s reference in A Rich Seam to deep learning being associated with learning goals problematic. Although such goals can guide the learning, i think deep learning is often directed by fuzzy goals.

Replied to
I think that ‘ownership’ is problematic. I remember it coming up in reference to domain of one’s own. In part that is what interests me about the IndieWeb ethos and POSSE.
Replied to WordPress Timeline JS Plugin by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
Writing blogs posts is nice because it documents things and makes me notice all sorts of things I missed in the heat of trying to get a working plugin but it also sucks because it takes me forever to write the post. These asides are also the reason I have 223 draft posts on my site.
I am loving all your work at the moment Tom around visualisations. I am going to spin this plugin up and see how I go. In regards to ‘events’, how does this relate to the idea of.h-events? Is it the same?
Replied to Google My Maps Tips and Tricks by Tom Mullaney (Sustainable Teaching)
Google My Maps is a great tool for teachers and learners. Teachers can use it as an interactive platform to present lesson materials. Learners can use Google My Maps to document what they have learned.
This is a good overview of Google Maps Tom. I note your issue with sharing ‘a copy’ of a map. I wonder if this relates in part to the fact that MyMaps is not a part of the core Education offering? One workaround that I have used in the past is have teachers provide a copy of a KMZ and then get students to load this. Although it involves a few more steps, it at least gets there in the end.
Replied to LMS Dogma by Reverend (bavatuesdays)
E.M. Forster’s “The Machine Stops,” Brett Victor’s “The Future of Programming,” and Audrey Watter’s PLATO review. I liked the way the idea of dogma weaved its way through all three pieces, and it resonated with the students as well.
Jim, I love Victor’s presentation on programming, as much for the style as the message (can they be separated?) However, I was left rethinking it in light of Victor’s take on making makerspaces more ‘scientific’ seeing space. It had me thinking how sometimes we can trivially end up picking and choosing between ideas and thinkers. For example, I would love to know Watters’ take on Seeing Spaces.
Replied to Writing to connect: knowing the “other” outside time & space (Reflecting Allowed)
Writing across each other’s blogs, I love how in some MOOCs, when people are focused on the same topic, one writes a post connecting ideas from multiple other posts, taking the ideas further, grabbing comments from elsewhere, and making something new, then recycling the ideas again. It’s a kind of “distributed” collaborative writing.
This is an intriguing reflection Maha. I like your points about writing across blogs, as well as connecting beyond ourselves. The one question I was left wondering is whether you would right the same post now? I too have written myself about the benefits of connected education. With both posts written a few years ago, I wonder if anything has changed? Would you still have the same outlook?