Replied to End goal for my 14 Day #IndieWeb WordPress Experiment by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)

I am going to try and conclude the end of my fourteen WordPress experiment by forking Alan’s theme and seeing if I can correctly add microformats2 and remove any conflicting microformats classes that maybe lingering in theme, ghosts of efforts past.

I look forward to seeing how you go with adding in Microformats. I am not quite at the point, yet. I would assume that if Dimensions works, that it would then open up the possibility of Alan Levine’s other themes.
Replied to The Little “b” and the Big “C” (CogDogBlog)

Another metaphor I often reach for is a DVD. Much of what we do in school feels like the movie on the disk- the paper, the project, the presentation, we focus on the final end product. But my favorite part of DVDs was always all the other stuff, the extras– the director’s commentary, the out takes, the location mini documentary, the story of the making of the movie.

I see blogging as providing that too.
Ask them to write Extras.

I love the notion of the ‘extras’ Alan. I think that I probably need to do more of this.

In regards to comments, I always wonder if we restrict what we consider as a response. I think that being constructive is useful. I just wonder if the ability to comment on Twitter or Micro.blog extends this?

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #150 (W. Ian O'Byrne)

Major depression is on the rise among Americans from all age groups, but is rising fastest among teens and young adults, new health insurance data shows.

So what is possibly behind the data? Possibly a mix of “how busy people are” in addition to time spent in front of screens, lack of community, isolation, and sleep disruption.

I am really interested in the posts of ‘friends’ and ‘depression’. I was really taken by Sarah Jeong’s recent reflection on leaving Facebook. One of the things that stood out from her discussion was the habits that we have lost or forgotten.

I sometimes feel bad about letting relationships lapse, but then I think that it takes two to tango. Really not sure. I think that the “True friends will stay in contact if you leave ” is an interesting one. Having wiped my Facebook content, I don’t agree. It can be easy to assume that others are still there, listening, watching, following, lurking. The irony with this is that even if we are active in such spaces, we are often at the whim of the algorithm.

It will be interesting to look back at the influence of technology on the current society. That is, to look at all the parts, such as change in work habits, family, society. Time will tell.

Replied to Fellowship of the SPLOT (bavatuesdays)

The idea is to try and get a series of these SPLOTs in cPanel dashboards across our shared hosting and institutional servers, not only get give folks access to these tools—although definitely that—but also in hopes people will see what’s possible and make their own SPLOTs that can in turn be shared back for others to use. In this way Reclaim could help provide a hub to distribute these “tiny teaching tools” (to misquote Tom Woodward).

I love Alan’s SPLOTs and the support Reclaim provides. I have used Big Picture to create my own ‘home’ page and supported someone in summarising their work. I think they offer so much potential.

I am wonder what place microformats play with all this? I have enjoyed following Greg McVerry’s effort to incorporate #IndieWeb values into his work with Higher Education. I must admit, with my ‘Sunday drive’ of a blog, I am still finding my way. Was just wondering.

Replied to Bildungs Punk at Re:publica 18 (bavatuesdays)

I am holding off because I have not watched boyd’s version of this talk at SXSWedu a couple of months earlier, and I wanted to given it came up in the Virtually Connecting session later that day.

Having watched boyd’s lecture, I thought that it continued the conversation from Digital Media Lab, last year, rather than SXSW.

That presentation is worth watching (or listening) too as well.

Replied to Blogging (bavatuesdays)

most folks treat their blog as if it were some kind of glossy headshot of their thinking, whereas the beauty and freedom of blogging was that it was by design a networked tool. Blogging provides a space to develop an online voice, connect with a particular network, and build a sense of identity online in conjunction with others working through a similar process. Scale in many ways became a distraction, one which was magnified to such a degree by the hype around MOOCs in edtech that anything less that 10s of thousands of “users,” “learners,” “participants,” followers,” etc. was tacitly considered somehow less than optimal for effective online learning. It was, and remains, a symptom of the capital-driven ethos of Silicon Valley that places all value on scale and numbers which is rooted in monetization—a reality that has infected edtech and helped to undermine the value and importance of forging an independent voice and intimate connections through what should be an independent media of expression. When scale is the endgame the whole process becomes bogged down in page views, followers, and likes rather than the freedom to explore and experiment with your ideas online. It’s a uniquely web-based version of Hell where the dominant form of communication online is a Medium think piece written by your friendly neighborhood thought leader.

This is a useful reflection on blogging and the distraction of scale Jim. To me, this relates to Bill Ferriter’s point about audience. Lately, I have stopped sharing everything everywhere POSSE style and really returned to writing stuff on my blog.
Replied to On the mission of the IndieWeb movement by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

What you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) is fine when you’re given all the functionality and control you need or want. It’s when you have additional needs and desires than the tools allow that WYSIWYG becomes a problem.
Social media WYSIWYG platforms like SnapChat, Twitter, Facebook/Instagram, et …

I have found #IndieWeb has challenged my use of markdown, especially in regards to comments. Unless I put in all the tags and code, the links do not flow through. My qualm with HTML is typing everything from scratch. Lately, I have been writing in Markdown and then pasting it into a convertor. Wondering if you use anything different Chris or Greg to make things easier?
Replied to 30 and Counting, Episode 5: Leaving Facebook… and replying over email? (30andcounting.me)

In this episode, I talk about my plans to leave Facebook and how I plan to in some ways replace it with a monthly newsletter. Then I brainstorm about how to receive replies and reactions from it.

I really like this idea Eddie. I guess it builds on the idea of creating custom web actions? I am not sure I would necessarily know where to start but interpreted that it is in part built around information in the URL. I currently use Tinyletter and haven’t explored MailChimp completely, but is this solution built into the template or your original posts?

Look forward to following your journey.

Replied to Creativity Tips Vlog Series: 1-10 #LDvid30 (AmusED)

Thanks to the inspiration of @karenmolonely of Sydney and my friend Helen Blunden of Melbourne I’ve taken up the challenge of recording a short (under 3 min) video each day and contributing t…

I love this Amy. It reminds me of microcasts. The rawness and reflective nature. I am also reminded of George Couros’ idea of #EDUin30 based on Twitter’s constraint of 30 seconds.

Another thing you could do is add your videos to Huffduffer using Ryan Barrett’s bookmarklet for video. This would allow you to create a quasi-podcast from your vlogs, although it would be temporary as Barrett only holds the audio stripped from YouTube for 30 days. It is a start though.

Replied to Issue #149 of the TL;DR Newsletter – rethinking the simple bare necessities. (TLDR)

Interesting view from Tom Hulme of Google Ventures arguing that teaching kids to code isn’t the future proofed ticket to future jobs as framed by many people. Deep machine learning will likely automate the writing of code relatively quickly. Creativity is going to be far more important in a future where software can code better than we can.

Wondering Ian if ‘coding’ can actually be a part of creativity? In my current work, I need to think creatively to design a solution that can accommodate a number of scenarios and situations, while at the same time being relatively simple. For me, this is about working within the constraints. I may not know how to code my solutions, but I am not going to buy a future where I have no knowledge of the way things work. I work with too many people who think they can make decisions (creative or critical) without understanding the context at hand.
Replied to 🔖 Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era by Tony Wagner and Ted Dintersmith by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

Bookmarked Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era by Tony Wagner, Ted Dintersmith (Scribner)
From two leading experts in education and entrepreneurship, an urgent call for the radical re-imagining of American education so that we better equip students for the realities of the future.

Chris, not sure if you are interested, but Benjamin Doxtdator wrote what I thought was an intriguing review of Most Likely to Succeed. Thought I’d share.
Replied to Stop dreaming, Australia: Google is staying in Sydney by John McDuling (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Amazon, for example, is currently auditioning 20 US cities to be the location for its second headquarters in North America. Those shortlisted include “rust-belt” cities such as Pittsburgh, Indianapolis and Columbus, Ohio (although two decidedly ‘global’ cities, New York and Washington DC, are the firm favourites to prevail).

The reaction from Australian cities to whispers that Google could leave Sydney suggests the search giant could have conducted a similar bake-off in Australia if it wanted to.

Maybe Google could move to Federation Square in Melbourne? It would seem that is a space for sale.
Replied to Gonski 2.0: Promoting a deficit view of Australian teachers (the édu flâneuse)

Of course we can and should improve Australian education. Of course we should have high expectations of students and educators. Of course we should develop our knowledge of effective teaching, learning and leading. Of course we should continue to develop our engagement with research and evidence. But Australian education is not a factory model of mass education production. It is not a calamitous problem to be solved, a bunch of broken individuals to be fixed, or a commercial opportunity ready to be flooded by corporate solutions. Australian teachers, school leaders and schools deserve trust, respect, support and involvement in policymaking.

I am really interested in your point about rhetoric. Another interesting read on the topic of testing and improvement is National Testing in Schools. I was really struct by the influence that NAPLAN has had on the way we speak about learning and education as a whole, especially Nicole Mockler’s chapter. It feels that this report continues some of this.
Replied to 5 Useful, Free Photo Apps for Teachers and Students (Primary Tech)

In this post, I’m going to share five apps to do with photography and images that I’ve been exploring lately.

I feel like these could be useful to help teachers and/or students overcome certain obstacles … or just have fun being creative.

This is an interesting collection of apps Kathleen. I think that what you use often comes down to which platform you are on.

I have collected some options and alternatives to Google Drawings, but these are usually web-based (although what is ‘the web’ when a Chromebook can run Android apps.)

In regards to Adobe, I wonder if the ‘school managed accounts’ can be used beyond just Adobe Spark?

Replied to Vic budget 2018 (danielbowen.com)

Essendon and Watergardens DDA, business cases for Broadmeadows/Pakenham, improvements Kananook and Seaford $16m — I’m a bit surprised Watergardens needs major works given it was only built in 2002. Does it suffer from capacity problems?

Dan, I wonder if the changes to Watergardens relates to issues around accessibility. It is currently built around steps and lifts. When the lifts break, as they seem to, it can be a problem.

This issue is only amplified by the capacity on the Sunbury line. I would imagine that this is only going to increase with the development of land between Caroline Springs and Melton. Really they are in need of ramps similar to Sunshine Station.

Replied to 👓 The Web We Need to Give Students | BRIGHT Magazine by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

Read The Web We Need to Give Students by Audrey Watters (BRIGHT Magazine) “Giving students their own digital domain is a radical act. It gives them the ability to work on the Web and with the Web.”

I must admit, I hadn’t read that post before. However, I did enjoy her book on the importance of domains though. I think that there are many cross overs between a Domain of One’s Own and the #IndieWeb.
Replied to Treading on Dreams: The Art of the #lookdown (AmusED)

Recently on a trip to Vancouver, Canada and Australia I decided to make a point of archiving some of the magnificent surfaces beneath my boots, and entitled the series #thesebootsaremadeforwalking.

It is fascinating to think about this idea Amy, having been in the middle of a conversation when you spotted your unicorn:

Amy's Canberra Unicorn

I had a similar experience with Alan Levine when I met up with him in Melbourne:


“Pick Your Lift” by cogdogblog is licensed under CC0

Having followed both of your work for some time, it was intriguing to see it all unfold serendipitously in real time.

In part I guess this falls under the wider notion of transparency, yet is somehow different. It is the context that often sits outside of the page (or post). Rather than worrying about which ‘tool’ the artist uses, it provides an insight into the life of the artist.

When I think about my own habits, I feel I am curious when it comes to the digital world, but could be more open to the physical world. For example, I recently discovered an initiative via Ian O’Byrne where trees in Melbourne are assigned an email address. To be fair, I love to go walking, but am often to busy in thought to notice the thriving world around me, let alone at my feet. This initiative at least helped call that out.

I found this the best thing about your sessions in Canberra. It is almost as if they provide ‘permission’ to somehow let go and be curious.

Maybe like Adrian Camm’s ‘permission to innovate’:

Permission to Innovate (Adrian Camm)


Permission to Innovate

Maybe you could give out literal permission to be curious cards?

Replied to #WhyITeach by John Wigg (Mr Wigg)

I teach because I love being a child’s advocate and helping him/her realize his/her own potential.

I remember deciding that I wanted to be a teacher when I left school and although I became a teacher, my reasoning for why I wanted to teach considerably changed. I started out with an interest in History and in hindsight, probably subject knowledge and skills, yet when I finished my studies I was more interested in creating the conditions for others to wonder.

I think I teach (or am involved in education) to support others in reaching their potential, but also in engaging in interests. I remember being told once that the word essay is best understood as ‘your say’. I have never actually found a reference for this, but the lesson stuck.

Syndicated at Read Write Collect

Replied to Have we moved on from the Cambridge Analytica scandal? (My Thoughts…)

This week has been fascinating, it appears that things have begun to recover after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, which then led to the #deletefacebook movement. This movement seemed to have a small, but noticeable impact for a moment on the pages that I support.

Although it is easy to ‘delete Facebook’, doing so without a replacement fails to recognise its place – positive or negative – in our life and society. I remember when I used to live in the Victorian country side being amazed by the amount of Weeping Willows growing along the open channels that carried water between the various properties. An introduced species, they actually sapped up a lot of the water. I once asked the Outdoor Education teacher I was working alongside why they did not just remove them. He explained that to simply remove them actually causes even more damage through erosion. What is needed was to plant something next to the tree that would be able to take its place and fill the same purpose. Delete Facebook was therefore never going to work without there being a replacement in its place.

The Luddbrarian suggests that what makes the current campaign different is that the data breaches allowed Trump to win. This overlooks the problem at the base of such automated solutions.

Facebook offers people an easy way to stay in touch with friends, Facebook offers people an easy way to stay on top of the news, Facebook makes it easy for people to share photos, Facebook makes it easy to plan events (and to say whether or not you’re going to the event), Facebook makes it easy to promote your new creative project, and so forth. In order to obtain these “goods” on offer from Facebook a user must deal with the “bads” of Facebook – but that is why the bribe exists and how it operates. The offer of the good is used so that people overlook the bad.

What we need is to widen our technological imagination and consider how Facebook could be better. For me, the #IndieWeb is a part of that.

Replied to Uncanny EdTech (bavatuesdays)

Uncanny Learning

Although the zombie apocalypse did not occur in 2012 (as much as I am aware), many of these futures sadly seemingly are coming into fruition. From net neutrality to Web 2.0, many ‘promises’ have failed. One highlight was the mention of Wordle. The uncanny aspect is that it feels like a conversation that is needed today as much as ten years ago.