Replied to The Edublogger’s Guide To Podcasting by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
This guide helps teachers and students learn how to consume and create their own podcasts.
This is a thorough guide Kathleen. I think that podcasts offer so much potential. I have written before about creating podcasts with Edublogs, as well as collected together a number of resources and reflections.

One of the challenges I have faced of late is creating using a Chromebook. I love Audacity, but this is not an option. I wonder if the addition of Android apps will alleviate this. Interestingly, it is easier to edit video on a Chromebook, than audio.

A development that I have engaged lately is the idea of microcasts. I think that as a model, it offers a different entry point. In some ways Flipgrid captures some of this.

Another useful tool is Jon Udell’s work around clipping video and audio. This then allows you to embed snippets, therefore offering yet another entry point.

Replied to Freshly Brewed Thoughts: March 30, 2018 (mailchi.mp)
I’m supporting Thought Shrapnel on Patreon and I have to say, I’m inspired by Doug’s use of the platform. I updated my own Patreon page a bit and have started sharing things just for patrons.
I find this move to Patreon interesting. I have unpacked it elsewhere. I am wondering about the impact that this has on the open web? Am I allowed to share something that is for a privileged audience?
Replied to Issue #119 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by Ian O'Byrne (mailchi.mp)
My concern is not Google, Facebook, and others that I give my data...my concern is the unseen/unknown companies that buy my data. Also, keep in mind that your biggest concern (in the U.S.) should be your Internet Service Provider (ISP). They're sucking up your data, watching your searching/browsing habits, connecting this to your billing info, and selling/giving this off to everyone.
This is such an interesting topic Ian. I too have touched upon it in my newsletter. I agree with your point that there are bigger, dirtier parties at play within this area, I am just concerned about excluding the FANGS from the discussion.

I also wonder what ‘informed consent’ looks like in the future? I think improvements to the Terms and Conditions is only the beginning. It has me returning to Doug Belshaw’s elements:


“The 8 Essential Elements of Digital Literacies #digilit” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

To be ‘informed’ surely is about having a deeper understanding of the way that technology and literacies work?

Replied to 12 'Lesson Hacks' to Nurture Inquiry by Kath Murdoch (Kath Murdoch)
Inquiry classrooms (and inquiry teachers) are constructed day by day, session by session. Being conscious of the choreography of our teaching and the degree to which it amplifies or diminishes inquiry is a powerful way to build culture over time. These ‘hacks’ are simple but by making one change, we can gain insights to which we have been previously blind.
Great post Kath. I think that for some the idea of Inquiry can be so daunting, there are however so many starting points. Your use of the work ‘hack’ reminds me of a quote from a RN Future Tense podcast from a few years ago looking at civic hacking:

Hacker culture is about doing clever, creative things with technology; basically coming up with ways to apply our technical skills for the benefit of society.

I am also reminded of hearing Will Richardson talking about changing 10% at a time. Although he was talking about becoming a ‘connected educator’, the same premise applies here. If a teacher were to apply all 12 hacks, I think that they would be well on the way to changing the whole of their classroom.

Image via “Stormtroopers Training: Theory” by Pedro Vezini https://flickr.com/photos/pedrovezini/5450412111 is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA
Quote via Kath Murdoch ‘‘12 ‘Lesson Hacks’ to Nurture Inquiry’’
Replied to Digg Shrugg by Alan LevineAlan Levine (CogDogBlog)
Born as the bastard child of Google Reader, Digg’s own spawn came into being June 26, 2013 as a ray of hope for the RSS fanatics, aiming to offer the same feature set as the dead Google parent. Digg Reader lived a placid life, not quite firmly connected with it’s parent’s products (whatever they are) but performed a yeoman’s service for the dwindling few who believed in the choice of news and information sources, rather than sucking up to the hose of some algorithm. But Digg Reader’s health was failing as many noticed the dwindling reliability and upkeep of the mobile app. It’s death was mercifully quick, it did not suffer long, yet left most wondering in its wake why it was even sick.
I totally get your point about feed readers not actually holding our information as such, I think that Inoreader takes this a step further with the ability to subscribe to feeds which can easily be stored in WordPress. Maybe there is a potential of a linksplot?
Replied to @mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the by wiobyrnewiobyrne (Scholar Social)
@mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the "commonplace book" on the WordPress site, keep it simple, and have it pump into my weekly newsletter. Any links/guida...
I agree with @ChrisAldrich about post kind plugins. Although I have more variants than the kinds provided, they offer a really good starting point.

Clint Lalonde Also wrote about the use of MailPoet To curate his newsletter. It doesn’t suit me at this point in time, but might suit you. Also, I think MailChimp allows you to collate via blog posts too? I assume that is what @dajbelshaw is doing with Thought Shrapnel.

Replied to Typing Tips: The How and Why of Teaching Students Keyboarding Skills by Kathleen Morris (Primary Tech)
There are so many great games and online tools designed for younger students. Once students begin recognising the alphabet, I think they can begin learning to type. This can complement your teaching of traditional writing and literacy. Some schools of thought suggest that typing might be the new cursive. So instead of investing time in teaching students how to join their writing in middle primary school, perhaps there could be more of a focus on improving keyboarding skills.
Interesting post Kathleen.

It feels like we spend so much time debating handwriting sometimes that we forget about typing. I really like how you compare the different applications in a concise fashion.

You might be interested in this post from Catherine Gatt, in which she reflects on the development associated with learning to type.

Replied to Facebook scraped call, text message data for years from Android phones [Updated] (Ars Technica)
If you granted permission to read contacts during Facebook's installation on Android a few versions ago—specifically before Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean)—that permission also granted Facebook access to call and message logs by default. The permission structure was changed in the Android API in version 16. But Android applications could bypass this change if they were written to earlier versions of the API, so Facebook API could continue to gain access to call and SMS data by specifying an earlier Android SDK version. Google deprecated version 4.0 of the Android API in October 2017—the point at which the latest call metadata in Facebook users' data was found. Apple iOS has never allowed silent access to call data.
Isn’t WhatsApp built on access to your contacts? And isn’t it owned by Facebook?
Replied to On the Need for Phone Free Classrooms by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
I know that I have pushed the use of phones in our classrooms before on this blog, how I have written about using them purposefully, but I will no longer subscribe to the notion that when kids use their phones it is only because they are bored. It is too easy to say that if teachers just created relevant and engaging lessons then no child would use their phones improperly in our rooms. That’s not it, all of us with devices have had our attention spans rewired to constantly seek stimulus. To instantly seek something other than what we are doing. To constantly seek something different even if what we are doing is actually interesting. And not because what we seek out is so much better, look at most people’s Snapchat streaks and you will see irrelevant images of tables and floors and half faces simply to keep a streak alive. It is not that our students are leaving our teaching behind at all times because they are bored, it is more because many of us, adults and children alike, have lost the ability to focus on anything for a longer period of time.
Pernille, you might be interested in a Douglas Rushkoff’s recent reflection at the beginning of a Team Human episode. He wonders why is it so easy for people to lose sight of the design and purpose behind these platforms? He argues that other than teaching media, social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram etc) should never be used by schools. I think that this crosses over to the smartphone debate.
Replied to Feature Suggestion: Media field to include in reply contexts · Issue #157 · dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)
GitHub is where people build software. More than 27 million people use GitHub to discover, fork, and contribute to over 80 million projects.
I think that this would be a useful addition. Although it is easy enough to use HTML tag;

It is just another thing to consider. Thinking about the ‘user’, anytime that such steps can be baked in is a good thing.