Replied How to Win an Argument Every Time, Why You Should Not, & What it Means for Education by Bernard Bull (Etale)
it is not good to win arguments every time. As much as I value the article and the infographic, and as much as I took a little time to track down the context for the infographic, the title focuses our attention on trying to win the argument every time. I disagree, and not just in situations where we recognize that we are wrong. Sometimes we are completely convinced that we are right, but we are not. To win would take us and others further away from the objective truth or the wisest course of action. I contend that the pursuit of such an approach, while we will never do it fully or perfectly, is an important part of civil discourse, the cultivation of wisdom, much needed leadership, and actual progress. If truth matters and we value wisdom in the modern world, then skill in rhetoric must always be paired with humility and a love for that which is wise, true, beautiful, and good.
This is a useful post Bernard. It reminds me of a post I wrote a few years ago on the dangers of tribes and evolving the conversation. It feels as if social media pushes us to these extremes at times, rather than the grey space.

Coming from a Literature background, so often things are structured are power and persuasion. I feel if I had (or have) my time again how I might bring some more nuanced conversations in the classroom. I think that the Visible Learning routines can be helpful in developing this.

Replied Teaching Critical Thinking? These Mythbusters Activities Will Help by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
Our goal is to help students recognize that gaps in thinking aren’t something to be afraid of.  They are something to be openly acknowledged and then addressed through deliberate attempts to gather more information.
Bill this is fantastic idea. I like the use of a graphic organiser to scaffold the thinking. It reminds me of the Zoom In routine, where it is impossible to ‘know’ what the image is, therefore forcing student to justify their interpretations.
Replied Find a Doorway That Fits Us Both by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
As King suggests the first line is an invitation. As a teacher this might be the first interaction in a school day, or the opening activity of a period of learning. Crucial moments to draw learners in and engage their curiosity.
I think that this counts for blogs as well. With the statistics suggesting that people rarely read beyond the first few lines, it is important to make it count. For the last year I have been starting each post with an ‘excerpt’ that hopefully helps readers know if it is of interest.
Replied 50 blog post ideas for educators (thecompellededucator.com)
Sometimes it can be tough to come up with ideas on what to blog about. As a regular blogger, I get asked the question alot... "What should/will I blog about?" Here's a list of 50 blog post ideas for educators.
This is a great list Jennifer. Along with ‘100+ Ideas and Prompts for Student Blogging’ from Ronnie Burt, Sue Waters and Kathleen Morris and ’10 Blog Post Ideas for your School Blog’ from Richard Byrne, they provide a useful place to start for those unsure where to start.
Replied Comments For Kids Still Count: Teaching And Promoting Quality Commenting by Kathleen Morris (Primary Tech)
While we can’t control what goes on in the larger blogging community too much, we have much more control over our classroom blogging programs. The comment section is an excellent place to connect, learn, and grow. Who wouldn’t want to tap into that?
Thoughtful as always Kathleen. I found blogging in the classroom really interesting, especially for older students who were well already versed in social media. They actually struggled to properly converse. I still wonder why? I am sure that I could have implemented more elements that you touch upon, but I also think that there was a shallowness. There were habits associated with feedback and engagement that we can sometimes take for granted. When I think about Doug Belshaw’s Elements of Digital Literacies, it feels as if this comes back to communication and confidence, as much as it comes down to cognition and constructive use.

When we rue the old days I wonder if we would be willing to give everything up to go back there? We complain about ‘micro-engagement’, but how many of us are willing to turn our back on the ease and benefits that it can bring? I am reminded of lyrics from The Bleacher’s track, I Miss Those Days:

And everyone is changing
And the storefront’s rearranging
I picked up a quarter and I just saw my face
But it’s all coming back now
Like the feeling isn’t over
Hey, I know I was lost but I miss those days

I am sure that there are aspects that have been lost, but I also wonder if there have been benefits as well? Blogging has changed and always will or as Martin Weller puts it, “the future of blogging is blogging”:

I know blogging isn’t like it used to be. It isn’t 2005 anymore, and those early years were very exciting, full of possibility and novelty. But just because it isn’t what it was, doesn’t mean it isn’t what it is. And that is interesting in its own way, some of the old flush is still there, plus a new set of possibilities. Blogging is both like it used to be, and a completely different thing.

One innovation that I think has potential for supporting comemnts is Micro.blog. It allows users to share a feed from their blog to a central space and converse there. It is build on webmentions which allow comments to be syndicated back to your own site. Although I am not sure that the platform as it currently stands would be the answer, I think the features show a real prospect. I tried using the dashboard in Global2, but found the space was too busy.

I am wondering if you have any thoughts how we could improve comments outside of the classroom too?

Replied Technology isn’t the problem by Greg Whitby (bluyonder.wordpress.com)
I believe the bigger question is how we as a society, respond to the seismic shifts happening. Since we can’t ignore the digital age, we must find ways of navigating the new frontier including what we deem as acceptable and appropriate use at home, at work and at school. Banning mobile phones is not a solution, it’s a reaction to the massive waves of ever-changing technologies. There’s an air of anti-intellectualism in all of this – a fear of the new sciences that was just as evident in the time of Galileo. 
This is a useful provocation Greg for a wider discussion. To ‘ban’ mobile devices seems more convenient than embracing the opportunity. My only concern is that too often we embrace the smartphone without stopping to critique the implications for data, surveillance and commerical influence. The question that we need to ask is whether it is ethical and maybe start from there?
Replied Fragmentions for Better Highlighting and Direct References on the Web by Chris Aldrich (Boffosocko)
Fragmention is a portmanteau word made up of fragment and mention (or even Webmention), but in more technical terms, it’s a simple way of creating a URL that not only targets a particular page on the internet, but allows you to target a specific sub-section of that page whether it’s a photo, paragraph, a few words, or even specific HTML elements like
or on such a page. In short, it’s like a permalink to content within a web page instead of just the page itself.
Another fantastic post Chris. I love the notion of mentioning a specific part of the text and find it particular useful to link back to sections from my longer posts or parts of my newsletters.

I find it interesting to consider alongside Hypothesis and wonder what the different use cases are?

I have added the plugin, but found the documentation associated with Kartik Prabhu’s additional code confusing, so left it. Is this what Khurt was referring to?

I look forward to seeing where all this grows?

Aaron

P.S. I thought that Flickr sent webmentions (as it is attached to Bridgy), however I was clearly wrong. Sorry.

Replied
I have replied to the fear about ‘micro engagement’ before, wondering what it actually is we classify as a comment. What I wonder everytime I read that sort of thing is what the alternative looks like? Mastadon? Newsletters? Micro.blog? The question I am left with is if you were to look ahead five years into the future, what would you see and how did we get there?
Replied Has the meaning of “blog post” changed? by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
I would still say that a blog is primarily a space for a person to process their thinking and do the messy reflection Ferriter suggests. We might be inundated with the polished self-help style articles that panders to a dependent audience but that doesn’t stop every writer forging their own rationale for creating their own digital space.
Thank you Tom for taking the time to respond. I am well aware that blogging has changed and enjoyed your story shared on the Design and Play podcast.

There is one point in your post I wish to clarify:

Davis ponders on whether we should [still] be promoting blogging as a way to connect with an engaged community of thoughtful contributors.

I am not questioning the act of blogging or microblogging. My work associated with the #IndieWeb surely demonstrates that. Rather, I am concerned about the idea of modelling such an intense pattern of writing as means of introduction for those who maybe uninitiated. Just my opinion I guess.

The irony of it all is that I love your writing and always get so much out of it, so I guess I should be grateful for #28daysofwriting as well as your newsletter.

I am left with a thought, maybe the newsletter not micro engagement that has been the ‘death of blogging’? Anyway, enough for now.

Replied
Is it a reflection on the current climate and culture of work? Assumptions that become ingrained. Although about art, these posts might interest you as I think that there are some cross-over.