Replied to Google is planning a city. What could go wrong? (ABC News)
Google affiliate Sidewalk Labs has plans to build and run an urban centre in Toronto, Canada. Not everyone is pleased.
The Sidewalk Labs is such an intriguing project. It offers an insight on what could be on so many levels. It is interesting to think about it in regards to the Selfish Ledger and Google’s move into (and out of) military AI. Imagine if they used Sidewalk Labs to hone their ability to identify citizens? Similar to China? And then have another about face and sell this technology to the highest bidder? Time will tell.
Replied to Hacking an Ontario Extend Visited Countries Map (CogDogBlog)


Alan visited 17 countries (7.55%)
Create your own visited map of The World

While most people might fog over in a faint at the site of HTML, to me it’s like good coffee. So in the img tag, src="" contains a URL we are calling some kind of Google API for charts that dynmically returns an image. Without bothering too much, I can guess easily for the value chld=BS|BZ|CA|MX|PR|US|VI|CN|JP|QA|SG|AU|NZ|DE|IS|ES|GB we are sending the list oc countries to map.

You can play with it in a web browser, by adding or removing countries. Try manipulating this URL

In following your blog Alan, I have learned to the love the URL. There is so much hidden in the code and not all of it is that complicated. A simple one that I got from you is ?random to pick a random post.
Replied to a post (jgregorymcverry.com)
@dogtrax been poking around for a bit and can’t figure out any way to add the #IndieWeb plumbing to @edublogs. You could (and should) manually put an h-card on your home page, but since @edublogs do not provide users with the freedom of adding plugins to WordPress you won’t be able to add any of the cool webmentions or have post marked up with h-entry to allow you to play.
I have been wondering about this for a while. My thoughts were whether you could bake the code into the HTML of the post. Obviously though without the appropriate piping associated with rel=me and Bridgy it isn’t going to work.

I wonder what would be involved in making it work? They have added plugins before, what would an IndieBlogs plugin look like? My concern is that this might mean for primary aged blogs?

I see real prospect for something like Micro.Blogs in schood, but again there is the issue around Rel=Me.

I imagine that until it is built into the core then it will be a hard ask.

Replied to a post (jgregorymcverry.com)
The new Google Sites is just as bad at teaching kids to write the web as the old Google Sites. No where can I find a link to a source code or how to get to a plain text editor. #edtechchat
Firstly Greg, (new) Sites is still in ‘beta’ to my knowledge. Unless it has changed in the last few days with GDPR it is not available in Takeout.

Secondly, I think that they are designing it for automagical websites. You provide the content and AI does the rest. Wasn’t their answer to everything last year AI? (This year it is accessibility IMO).

At least it is easier to use than (old) Sites and responsive.

Replied to Identifying what we can control in our own lives (W. Ian O'Byrne)
When we have a problem, we know exactly what to work on. When we are stuck and have no idea where to start, we begin working on the obstacle in our path.
I find external influences an interesting topic. I am not sure how stoic I am though.

On a side note, I really enjoyed Kin Lane’s recent post on choosing to ‘seize the day’ and not be overrun by fear.

Each day I am able to seize the widest possible definition of my day that I can. Across multiple cities, states, or countries if I so choose. I do this without being shot. I do this without the financial system crumbling around me, or the government invading my home. I do this without any brown person hurting me or taking my job. I do this without dying of cancer received from being scanned at the airport. Why is it that I’m able to move around so freely? What makes it so that I can seize the day without a gun on my side, or within arms reach? It is because I’ve chosen to seize the day from the fears I’ve been programmed with in the past, and from the possible futures these fears can dream up. I’ve seized the day for me. Not for what might be. It is my day. I get to decide. I get to enjoy it to its fullest, without any concern for tomorrow.

Replied to Blogging, small-b, Big B (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Currently, my main blog serves as a space for me to narrate my work, or think out loud. I see it as a machine where I consume, curate, and archive materials on my breadcrumbs site, synthesize each week in my newsletter, and then perhaps pull together the loose threads (as I see them) in posts on my blog…or elsewhere. All of these ideas are half-formed at best. They may go on to other things or spaces. As an example, bookmarks saved in the breadcrumbs often turn into blog posts. A series of blog posts have turned into keynotes or lectures. A collection are currently morphing into a book or two. But, all of these ideas are raw, and serve as pre-prints to work that may live later on, or always exist in their current format. When content turns into an article, publication, or other content outside of my main website, I usually bring it back to my spaces by providing a “Director’s Cut” version of my work that includes the Google Doc of the original draft or other insights.
There are times Ian when I wonder why I post what I do. Then there are moments like this, and also recently with another post, where the comments and interaction have really stretched my thinking.

I also really like your point about little beginnings leading to greater things. I have found that the more deliberate approach of using my blog for more, rather than social media, has led to more connections. Reminds me of Amy Burvall’s point about ‘gathering dust for stars.’

Replied to Future of Things (FoT): In An Era of Encroachment (DCulberhouse)
The question is no longer as much about whether automation and artificial intelligence will come after my job, but whether or not I am continuously learning the skills, skillsets, and knowledge that will still make me viable and valuable whether automation or artificial intelligence comes after my job or not.
David, I am really intrigued by the comparison between flight and AI. What I feel is missing in the conversation are the consequences associated with such change. For example, we are now grappling with the challenges associated with fuel and pollution. Listen to RN Future Tense for an interesting take on where things are at.

I am not against the ‘future of things’, AI and changes in work, but I think that we need to do more work to understand and appreciate such changes. For me, this involves:

  • Asking questions as a part of critical reflection
  • Learning from and through others (as you touch on elsewhere)
  • Continually engaging in new challenges to disrupt habits
Replied to It’s spring cleaning time for Blogger (Official Blogger Blog)
To make room for some exciting updates coming soon to Blogger, we’re simplifying the platform to enhance the blogging experience for all of our users.
It feels like these changes have been mooted for a while. I was told last year to think ‘Medium’. It will be interesting to see.
Replied to no more email subscriptions (jarche.com)
There are several ways to subscribe to this blog and I have just removed two: Feedburner (Google), and Webfish. This will be the last post you receive via email as I am cancelling subscriptions and deleting all subscribers in the next 24 hours. Why am I doing this? 1. I do not agree with Google’s...
Harold, you have me thinking about my use of email. I think that I will maintain my email related to my newsletter. However, I am wondering about my blog(s).

Another option you didn’t include in following blogs via email is IFTTT.

Replied to The Fortnite Phenomenon (Where Social Gaming and Kid Culture Collide) by dogtrax (dogtrax.edublogs.org)
I soon realized that the boys were “playing” Fortnite, the multi-player video game phenomenon that I know has been part of many of the students’ gaming lives for weeks now. But to see it being acted out — the axes being used to clear bushes and trees to make hiding spaces in the game world — just looked … odd.
One of the things that I love about following your blog Kevin is your documentation of various cultural movements. No longer in the classroom, it can be useful in keeping a finger on the pulse. Fortnite seems intriguing.