Replied to E-Learning 3.0 : some initial thoughts by jennymackness (Jenny Connected)
Stephen then went on to discuss the significance of the Cloud and Graph elements of his diagram. Here he lost me. He told us that anyone could learn this if we put the effort in and that through this we would learn how to create new types of distributed and connected learning resources. I found myself thinking that I have always like driving; I know how to change a wheel, and when opening the bonnet where to top up the screen wash and oil. I can even jump start another car if necessary, but beyond this I am not interested. I take the car to the garage and let someone else with years of experience sort it out. Similarly with technology. I am simply not sufficiently interested to get into the nitty gritty. I am not interested in learning how to programme or learning different computer languages. I think there will probably be more people like me than technical experts (although maybe not on this course!), so I wonder what the implications of this are for a distributed model. Further, I like the fact that I can come to this course and know that Stephen has the experience, has done all the work and is willing to share this. I am grateful to him for this and his generous openness, but it does not make me want to learn programming 🙂
This course sounds interesting Jenny. Might have to take a look. I think that I must have overlooked it because of busyness.

I also like your point Jenny about driving and technology.

Replied to Clean Google Doc Cut/Paste into WordPress Editor by Tom Woodward (Bionic Teaching)
If you cut/paste from a Google Doc into the WordPress WYSIWYG editor you get more than I want. Mainly a bunch of inline CSS that sets the font weight (see below). This is a pain because it’s going to take priority in CSS land and undoing it by hand is a hassle.
This looks great Tom. This might resolve some of the junk code brought across from Blogger too? Will have to investigate.
Replied to Online disinhibition effect by Ian O'Byrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Suler might suggest that benign disinhibition brings us together and toxic disinhibition rips us apart. Saying things in digital spaces it may seem less real, more impersonal, and even dehumanizing because the person you are addressing may be unknown and not physically in front of you. We need to consider that our society is slowly coming to terms with these digital identities that we construct. We also need to understand that our communications are asynchronous in nature. This means that the trail of comments, likes, and links stays around long after we’ve moved on.
This is an interesting discussion Ian. I have been thinking about the online/off dualism while reading Zeynep Tufekci’s Twitter and Teargas:

Rather than connecting with people who are like them only in ascribed characteristics — things we mostly acquire from birth, like family, race, and social class (though this one can change throughout one’s life)—many people have the opportunity to seek connections with others who share similar interests and motivations. Of course, place, race, family, gender, and social class continue to play a very important role in structuring human relationships—but the scope and the scale of their power and their role as a social mechanism have shifted and changed as modernity advanced.(Page 10)

I am really intrigued by Tufekci’s discussion of the networked public sphere.

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #169 by Ian O'Byrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
The latest update to Pocket improves on its text-to-speech feature. This will allow the app to read your bookmarked pages to you. This is a great opportunity to save pages, and listen to them during your commute, or going for a walk. I’m definitely testing this out in my classes…and recommending it for students.
I am glad that Pocket has improved the text-to-speech feature. I found it frustrating when listening hands free and it would stop playing when it hit a post that was not downloaded. This seems to be resolved.

I have written about my workflow elsewhere, but find it useful when saving longer posts for later. Basically, I start with Inoreader. If the post is too long to read I save it. Definitely a useful tool for students to have in toolography.

Replied to Why Public Transportation Works Better Outside the U.S. (CityLab)
The widespread failure of American mass transit is usually blamed on cheap gas and suburban sprawl. But the full story of why other countries succeed is more complicated.
Reading your discussion of public transport, it is interesting to think about Australia and in particular Melbourne. It feels like we sit somewhere between America and Europe. Although the network is integrated with a tap on and off system in place, there is still the lack of regularity in some places.

Living in a new suburb amoungst the sprawl, we have one bus route which runs every hour, which is pretty useless and another which runs every twenty minutes. I usually end up driving to the station, where the trains run close to every six minutes during peak. However, there are only a limited number of parks.

There is the promise of new infrastructure, new tunnels and ring around the city. However, this will still take time and there is no political guarantee, especially when many of the ideas were first mooted in the 60’s.


Marginalia

Instead of building highways first, which tends to make neighborhoods auto-centric and de-prioritizes transit, European cities tended to put transit first when they built new neighborhoods.

Why do we only run decent service on expensive subways that were built from scratch?

Germany, for example, high-speed Autobahnen go just about everywhere. The land of BMW and Mercedes-Benz boasts a strong car culture, and its plans for a national network of expressways were first formed in the 1920s; indeed, these highways helped inspire America’s interstate build-out. But Germany never stopped building rail systems

Fares need to be low enough that people can afford to take transit. New York City will soon join other cities like Tucson and Ann Arbor in having discounted fares for low-income people. That is important to make transit accessible to everyone. But fair fares isn’t just about keeping fares low. It’s also about eliminating arbitrary inequities. People shouldn’t have to pay a transfer penalty or a double fare just because they switch from bus to rail, transfer between agencies, or travel across the city limits. A transfer is an inconvenience—you shouldn’t have to pay extra for it

Nearly every Torontonian is within a 15-minute walk of a 24-hour bus route. Virtually every one of the major roads on the city’s grid has a bus route that comes at least every 10 minutes, all day long. People making long trips across town usually transfer to the subway for a quicker ride, but it is also convenient to make cross-suburban journeys by transferring between buses—they come frequently enough that there is little risk of standing for an hour at a forlorn suburban bus stop waiting for the connection

Replied to Heather Havrilesky: There Are Too Many Gurus in America (Literary Hub)
More than anything else, the modern guru denies the existence of external obstacles. Racism, systemic bias, income inequality—to acknowledge these would be to deny the power of the self. They are sidestepped in favor of handy modern conveniences, or the importance of casting off draining relationships, or the constant quest to say no to the countless opportunities rolling your way. What an indulgence it must be, to have your greatest obstacles be “sugar” or “anger” or “toxins.” In many ways, the artist might be seen as the polar opposite of the guru.
I agree with your comments John. There is a level of belief and entitlement within this work that has always left me feeling uneasy. After listening to a few episodes, I removed the podcast from my feed.

I feel that people like Austin Kleon, although also a part of the self-help genre, add a sense of fragility to their work.

Replied to Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning by Clint Lalonde (EdTech Factotum)
I have added in the Indieweb WordPress plugin which adds some Indieweb features to the site that will, hopefully, help me better control the flow of data from the blog
Great to see you tinkering Clint. Pretty sure the bridge to Facebook died with Cambridge Analytica. If you are looking for any ideas and inspiration, I highly recommend diving into Chris Aldrich’s research. There is always something there I feel I have overlooked.
Replied to What would go into your Room 101? - Issue 101 - (Dialogic Learning Weekly)
My second contender is Effect Size. Unfortunately, this term suffers from the ignominy of Nominal Fallacy. We think we know what this means but it is much more complex. I have long been trying to wrap my head around the use of this statistical calculation in education. It seems to have taken root in our edu-speak, however, it looks like we are using it incorrectly.
I am pretty sure I misuse ‘effect size’.

Personally, I prefer ‘warm data’ that is embedded in context. I recommend the most recent episode of Team Human.

In regards to jargon, you might enjoy Diane Kashin’s discussion of ‘cute’.

Replied to A Pedagogy of the Internet by Clint Lalonde (EdTech Factotum)
So, all this is to say, for me, the pedagogical piece that I am most interested in is what the open internet enables, and exploring what it means to participate in a meaningful way on the open, public internet. What are the challenges? What are the benefits? Why do I feel it is important that educators and students participate in these open spaces?
Your discussion here of online pedagogies reminds me of Chapter 2 of Anderson and Dron’s book Teaching Crowds. What it has me thinking is that different spaces are conducive to different pedagogical outcomes. I remember a few years ago asking someone from Google what their pedagogical stance was (I was thinking inquiry vs. instruction back then) and he stated that Google was not about deciding other people’s pedagogy. This may be true in part but if you look at there movement into transformation and subsequently online learning then the technology seems to produce certain outcomes.