Replied to INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
For today’s #edu522 #dailyponderance you need to highlight some cool #edtech tools. Give us 3-5 apps or websites we should try in class. (I went easy…I had another idea but would have to describe Fork, PR, commit, and merge conflict….way too much for rainy Saturday).
My five tools I’d suggest are:
– Pocket
– Inoreader
– Trello
– Typely
– Noterlive
Read elaborations here: https://readwriterespond.com/2017/11/workflows/
Replied to Land of 1000 SPLOTs (bavatuesdays)
So, Reclaim Today is a thing. Tim Owens moves so fast it is hard for the rest of us to keep up, but there are officially four episodes of our live video show, and I’ve been in half of them :)…
I am enjoying the new [enter name here]. I was interested in your comment about bookmarking. I feel that I have different solutions set up for different purposes. I guess what is missed in the end is that aren’t they all just a file with a bunch of links. The real challenge that I find is which method would help me to uncover what it is I think I am looking for the most efficiently.

Also wondering, the [enter name here] would look good in a SPLOT?

Originally posted on Read Write Collect

Replied to #EDU522 Launch Videos and Updates: Join an #IndieWeb Blogging 101 Course by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
The time has arrived and a new breed of educational bloggers will emerge from the ashes of the #EDU522. Having a focus on learning, open pedagogy, and the #indieweb as educators we will spend the next three weeks understanding how to teach with digital tools by trying out new digital tools.
I love what you are putting together here Greg. I am reminded of #walkmyworld work, as well as the Rhizo MOOCS.

Not sure how much I will be contributing, but will definitely be dipping in and out where I can.

Replied to How Do You Find New/Interesting Blogs? by Kicks CondorKicks Condor (kickscondor.com)
Mostly, similar to what coldbrain has said, I find blogs when they are casually mentioned on a blog or comment somewhere. Stuff like blogrolls and directories and such just don’t seem to exist.
I have always found the traditional ‘list’ blogroll as limited and cumbersome. That is why I developed my own template. When I find a new author I add it to my spreadsheet.

I like this in part, but also find the workflow a little annoying. I wish it were more integrated with my site. That is what interests me about Chris Aldrich’s work.

Replied to INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION (jgregorymcverry.com)
I just joined @manton micro.blog community. Been syndicating to micro.blog but with @Twitter API changes announced and the total inaction on approving new dev apps or unsuspending my current syndication application it is clear Twitter won’t be the place for #IndieWeb POSSE model.
Greg, are you syndicating to Twitter from Micro.blog or have you started a hosted blog there?
Replied to Keeping track of articles you want to read (Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel)
I’d rather write about a few links rather than bookmark lots. I’ve all but given up on bookmarking, as it’s almost as quick to search the web for something I’m looking for as it is to search my bookmarks…
I find my ‘bookmarks’ are my personal itch. Although there are times when it is easy enough to search the web, there is something about the process of curating that helps me remember.

Although I have long left my Wikity, one of the practices that continues is the interlinking within my work. I often link back to other posts. I kind of see this sort of activity as about maintaining my memory.

I was really taken by this quote by Ryan Holiday:

As a researcher, you’re as rich as your database. Not only in being able to pull something out at a moment’s notice, but that that something gives you a starting point with which to make powerful connections. As cards about the same theme begin to accumulate, you’ll know you’re onto a big or important idea.

Replied to Celebrating the things we don’t measure by Gillian Light (a macgirl in a pc world)
  • how much more my students now speak in weekly literature circle discussions and how well prepared they are for what they want to say;
  • how engrossed they are in reading and how invested they are in the characters they identify with;
  • the quality of their questioning and the deep thinking they do about what they read, identifying themes, ideas and wonderings that hadn’t occurred to me;
  • their heightened understanding of how certain text types can be very powerful and really get things done, as seen through the number of them wanting to write to different levels of government after our parliamentary excursion;
  • their confidence in managing their own learning and identifying their own goals, inside and outside of the classroom;
  • their growing time and resource management skills that now see some of them much more able to find the key items they need at the start of the day and end the day feeling organised;
  • the coping strategies they have developed to deal with their own times of stress or anxiety and which they now avail themselves of without any need for a reminder from me;
  • the empathy they have developed towards not only each other but towards fellow human beings in the world beyond our classroom, as evident in the ideas they have about how they can improve their world for everyone’s benefit.
I remember a few years ago, when the new review process came in, I made every effort to stretch what the notion of data. Most teachers just fell into line with the simplicity of one years growth for one years teaching. Although ‘growth’ is important, to only focus on the summative feels like it misses something.
Replied to A Simple Plan to Make My Love of Reading Transparent to My Students by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
To make my love of reading even more transparent this year, I’m stealing an idea from my friend Pete Caggia: I’ve created a space on my board where I’m sharing the covers of the books that I’ve already read this year AND the cover of the book that I’m currently reading.
Bill, I am assuming that you only teach in the one classroom?