Listened Perfect prams for perfect parents: the rise of the bougie buggy – podcast by an author from the Guardian

How the rise of the luxury pram capitalised on the status anxiety of a new generation of parents

This is a fascinating insight into the Bugaboo. This includes a background to the development of the first Bugaboo prams, the role of Sex in the City and the way that it has changed peoples decisions.
Listened Why Silicon Valley billionaires are prepping for the apocalypse in New Zealand – podcast by Mark O'Connell from the Guardian
How an extreme libertarian tract predicting the collapse of liberal democracies – written by Jacob Rees-Mogg’s father – inspired the likes of Peter Thiel to buy up property across the Pacific


A text version can be found here.

Listened Ep. 79 Suzanne Slomin “Feeding A Living Culture” from teamhuman.fm
Playing for Team Human today is Suzanne Slomin, founder of Green Rabbit a small solar powered bakery located in the Mad River Valley of Vermont specializing in naturally leavened breads.Suzanne wi


In the introduction, Douglas Rushkoff reflections on the blockchain. This is in contrast to the usual hype. Rushkoff questions what happens when the incentive of mining bitcoin has gone? We are then back to the traditional banking structure where we are dependent on some sort entity to provide a subscription service.

For the feature, Rushkoff talks with Suzanne Slomin about baking bread. This is an insightful conversation. It reminds me of a similar conversation on the Eat This podcast. One of the aspects that stood out was the Slomin’s discussion of her use of living culture as opposed to industrial yeast. She describes how she has to regularly feed it or else it turns in on itself. This is a fantastic metaphor for change.

Listened Warm data, innovative electric transport and “fossil free steel” from Radio National
Green innovation comes in many forms. And promising project don't have to be big, they only have to make a start.


This episode of Future Tense captures a number of projects currently being explored associated with sustainability.

Listened The EduProtocol Field Guide: By Jon Corippo and Marlena Hebern from The TeacherCast Educational Network
In this episode of “Ask the Tech Coach,” we sit down with Jon Corippo and Marlena Hebern to discuss their new book Bring Your Teaching into Focus: The EduProtocol Field Guide
Listened Taking the time to be offline by Dean Pearman from Design and Play
In our first real episode for 2018, we revisit the importance of offline time and switching off. This is always a challenge when work is something you are incredibly passionate about. How do we develop good work habits when the lines are blurred so much? We explore the third space, a concept developed by Adam Fraser designed to help people transfer better between work and space. We once again circle back on time tracking and managing our time. We explore the value of what to measure when tracking time. Steve explains his tracking of interruptions and the use of reticular activation to intentionally manage his focus and habits. We talk about the books we read and those that just couldn’t bring ourselves to read (#blurredlines). This leads to a rich discussion on real evidence of learning and design thinking as a mental model. Student centred learning features as Dean explores his school’s new Inspire Me curriculum and the removal of the curriculum safety net.
Listened Episode 20, March 22, 2018 from llennon.podbean.com
The Admins are back at it. Discussing new releases, changes, and discoveries in the Admin Console. Oh yeah, almost forgot to mention, special guest is CYRUS MISTRY! (I really didn't come anywhere near close to forgetting that, I just wanted to add a little...
Cyrus Mistry from Google discusses the process for bringing a new Chromebook ‘feature’ to market. He uses the example of the world facing camera. The process begins by identifying what the feature requires and then where it will go. Once developed, the next step is a series of testing. This whole process usually takes a year to achieve.
Listened Inside the OED: can the world’s biggest dictionary survive the internet? – podcast by Andrew Dickson from the Guardian
For centuries, lexicographers have attempted to capture the entire English language. Technology might soon turn this dream into reality – but will it spell the end for dictionaries?
This is an intriguing insight into the effort to organise language. It is interesting to think about this exercise in regards to Google Books and machine learning. I feel that this is as much about world views and perspective.

The text version can be found here.

Listened The male glance: how we fail to take women’s stories seriously – podcast by Lili Loofbourow from the Guardian
Consider this a rational corrective to centuries of dismissive shrugs, then: look for the gorilla. Do what we already automatically do with male art: assume there is something worthy and interesting hiding there. If you find it, admire it. And outline it, so that others will see it too. Once you point it out, we’ll never miss it again. And we will be better for seeing as obvious and inevitable something that previously – absent the instructions – we simply couldn’t perceive.
Lili Loofbourow tries to rewrite the wrong that has male art is epic, universal, and profoundly meaningful, while Women’s creations as domestic, emotional and trivial. This critique of gender has ramifications far beyond fiction. When I think of music and the world of producers, it is another field dominated by males.

One interesting quote to come out of the piece was from Susan Sontag:

A famous Susan Sontag meditation on this aesthetic paradigm bears repeating: “The great advantage men have is that our culture allows two standards of male beauty: the boy and the man. The beauty of a boy resembles the beauty of a girl. In both sexes, it is a fragile kind of beauty and flourishes naturally only in the early part of the life cycle. Happily, men are able to accept themselves under another standard of good looks – heavier, rougher, more thickly built … There is no equivalent of this second standard for women. The single standard of beauty for women dictates that they must go on having clear skin. Every wrinkle, every line, every grey hair, is a defeat.”

Listened An Indieweb Podcast Episode 0 by David ShanskeDavid Shanske from David Shanske
This is a test episode of An Indieweb Podcast(working title). In it, Chris Aldrich and I talk about a variety of Indieweb topics, with the theme of Considering the User, inspired by an article we were reading.

I really enjoyed this David and Chris. It was a wonderful insight into the #IndieWeb community. A couple of take-aways:

  1. The possibilities associated with Post-Kinds. I am wondering if instead of creating additional tags and categories that I need to craft my own kinds to differentiate between podcasts and music.
  2. I feel that the future lies in the community. I concur with Chris that I do not think that my place is coding the future. Instead I think that my contribution is in testing and trialing different additions. A point that I made in response to Eli Mellen.

If theis were to become a semi-regular occurance, it would be good to have a basic summary of discussions, as well as links to support further investigations.

Oh, and in regards to ‘impact’ (something that we love in the education world), it encouraged me to add GitHub to Bridgy. Thank you for the support and community as always.