Liked Feel free to enjoy Gary Oldman's portrayal of Churchill but don't forget his problematic past (The Independent)
The man who took part in 'jolly little wars against barbarous people' and claimed to have shot three 'savages' also defended the use of concentration camps in South Africa and the use of poison gas against 'uncivilised tribes'
It is worth reading some of Raw’s replies on Twitter too:

Liked HEWN, No. 249 (TinyLetter)
Instead of experts, Zuckerberg says, it’s going to be up to “the community.” This disdain for experts is part of the problem we face now – culturally, politically, intellectually. There are researchers whose field of study is precisely this: how do people assess the credibility of information sources? How do technologies shape our notion of trust? How is trust gained, and how is trust violated? How is trust gamed? But why listen to experts when Facebook’s CEO can just get the engineers down the hall to cobble together some poll, and then tell the users this is what they wanted all along. Personalization.
Audrey Watters highlights yet another poor decision from Facebook to ignore experts in order to garners more ‘likes’ and supposed trust.
Liked Sometimes They Come Back by Jim Groom (bavatuesdays)
Documenting my work on this blog has basically defined my career. There is no way I would have remembered this assignment, no less gotten kudos from strangers more than a decade later, if I hadn’t taken the time to blog it. I am increasingly convinced that blogging is a long-term investment in your soul, and this is the most recent dividend.
Liked PLATO and the History of Education Technology (That Wasn't) (Hack Education)
The Friendly Orange Glow is a history of PLATO – one that has long deserved to be told and that Dear does with meticulous care and detail. (The book was some three decades in the making.) But it’s also a history of why, following Sputnik, the US government came to fund educational computing. Its also – in between the lines, if you will – a history of why the locus of computing and educational computing specifically shifted to places like MIT, Xerox PARC, Stanford. The answer is not “because the technology was better” – not entirely. The answer has to do in part with funding – what changed when these educational computing efforts were no longer backed by federal money and part of Cold War era research but by venture capital. (Spoiler alert: it changes the timeline. It changes the culture. It changes the mission. It changes the technology.) And the answer has everything to do with power and ideology – with dogma.
Liked Microblogging by Paul Robert Lloyd
Maybe a growing disillusion with social networks and the recent resurgence in blogging will bring with it an interest in these newer IndieWeb standards. I’d love to see more consumer-oriented publishing tools adopt MicroPub and Webmention so that their empowering capabilities become available to all. And it’d be great to see competitors to Micro.blog, each with their take on how to fix the problems we’ve uncovered during our embrace of social media. We have the technology; we just have to use it.
Liked A life in quotes: Ursula K Le Guin by Calla Wahlquist (the Guardian)
We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art, and very often in our art - the art of words.” — Speech at the National Book Awards upon receiving the US National Book Foundation’s media for distinguished contribution to American Letters on 19 November 2014.
Liked After Method by Jeremy Tromley (jmtrom.blogspot.com.au)
If methods compose reality, then we should select our methods based on what kind of reality we would like to see composed. This smacks a little of the extreme epistemological view that we can create whatever reality we want simply by imagining it to be so, but tied to the concept of the hinterland there are two significant differences. First of all, we have to start from where we are – the reality that is already composed – which provides the materials (literally and metaphorically) from which we can compose a new reality. And, second, composing a new reality will take work.
via Ian Guest
Liked Tiling SPLOTs the Easy Way; Maybe Soon Everything Else by Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDogAlan Levine aka CogDogProfile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDogAlan Levine aka CogDog (CogDogBlog)
Tiled surfaces are classy. And after doing one the method is learned quickly. Without knowing I was looking for it I found a seriously awesome WordPress plugin that I can see making a lot of use of.