Liked Radio #EDUtalk 07-02-2018 Loose Learners Ep 8: Generator Generation by John Johnston: Mariana Funes (EDUtalk)

Marianna & John discussing the use of online generators. Easy to use software.

John and Mariana consider a number of questions, including:

  • Do these make us or our students lazy? (I could do this from scratch but I can’t be bothered)
  • Do we end up with generator-envy? ( I will never be able to produce something as good as it does)
  • Do they offer a way into digital literacy that might encourage novices to learn more sophisticated tool?
  • Should we be using generators in class, if they have the potential to discourage learning?
  • Is some friction in tool use better for learning than ease?
Liked ‘Monocropping the Mind’ by Benjamin Doxtdator (Long View on Education)

On one level, the human capital narrative creates a restrictive idea of what is a valuable aim for education, most often preparing students for jobs in STEM. While national prosperity is supposed to hang on this monoculture experiment, there’s also a calculation that some – many – will fail unless they have the entrepreneurial skills and grit to make something of themselves. On another level, this free-market ideology is indeed an artificial ecology, propped up by massive (and often unacknowledged) state investment in information technology and biotech sectors and a stripping back of social services. We have gotten to a point where, as Shiva argues, alternatives are closed and killed off.

Liked Pedagogy, Not Outcomes – How to Do Maker Models for Language Arts by dave dave (davecormier.com)

But the journey of maker into language arts isn’t just a matter of finding time in the day. It makes sense because of narrative. So much of the creative is about coming up with a narrative for what you’re doing. Whether that’s just the name of the thing that has evolved out of your creative process or a whole story about it. The communication. The writing. The collaboration. The reflection. These are key skills that are needed for citizenship. Team that up with some coding and some maker skills and you’ve got a killer combination.

Liked Supporting Digital Practice – making time-for-learning by Dave CormierDave Cormier (davecormier.com)

‘Digital Practices’ are the things that I do that are born out of the affordances of our digital communications platforms. It is an assemblage of the digital skills i might have mediated through the digital literacy and habits that i have acquired. Or, to put it more simply, it’s ‘being digital’.

Liked Bernard Zuel (Bernard Zuel | Music Journalist)

Music journalist-at-large – blog, reviews & other media.

I came across this great site from Bernard Zuel sharing a range of interviews and reviews associated with music. My question though is why Wix? I really want someone to explain to me the appeal? I cannot read the content within my readers, instead pushed to the actual site. However, the reading experience there is poor. I respect the supposed simplicity, however I am left feeling that what Wix returns is not worth the compromise.
Liked Students’ Big Voices, Hearts & Minds Ready To Tackle Big Problems As Projects (Edu Change and Student Advocacy)

This is not intended to be an exhaustive or comprehensive list. However, these seven broad topics present hundreds of relevant challenges that our students can and should have opportunities to address.

Liked Mulling Time by Emily Fintelman (Mrs Fintelman Teaches)

The topic of what good professional learning looks like is always contentious. Some of us love to sit and listen and soak up some new knowledge from a great speaker. Others argue that the best professional learning happens in schools with colleagues through inquiry, observation and dialogue.
I thin…

Liked Why are the Liberals so terrified of our schools? (The Age)

We have had nearly 10 years of Labor’s MySchool website, which encourages parents to play the school system like the stock market. Low scores are punished with low enrolments, as privileged families flock to high-performing schools, and the least socially mobile remain at schools with the least resources to support them.
As a result, when public schools in Victoria have received meagre funding increases, these are too often wasted on programs that principals think will boost scores and reputation – even if they undermine real learning. Despite plenty of evidence that streaming actually reduces student achievement, select-entry programs are breaking out like algae plagues around the state. As are uniform policies that mimic private schools in pettiness and pricing.

Liked Embracing the chaos – by Matthew Esterman (Medium)

We are much more able to embrace the beautiful chaos of schools if we have a strategy, a team and an ongoing, intentional and publicly stated understanding about our role and responsibilities. Each of these elements might change over the course of time but for a given period (say a term or a year) we can build an effective environment that allows chaos to run its course, channelled into purposeful outcomes or released into the space of irrelevancy.

Liked “Just an Ass-Backward Tech Company”: How Twitter Lost the Internet War (The Hive)

At the same time, her defenders say, Harvey has been forced to clean up a mess that Twitter should have fixed years ago. Twitter’s backend was initially built on Ruby on Rails, a rudimentary web-application framework that made it nearly impossible to find a technical solution to the harassment problem. If Twitter’s co-founders had known what it would become, a third former executive told me, “you never would have built it on a Fisher-Price infrastructure.” Instead of building a product that could scale alongside the platform, former employees say, Twitter papered over its problems by hiring more moderators. “Because this is just an ass-backward tech company, let’s throw non-scalable, low-tech solutions on top of this low-tech, non-scalable problem.”