Liked “Choo-Choo-Choose your license!” Infographic on Creative Commons licences by an author
This infographic on Creative Commons licences illustrates your choices when you want to publish your own work under a CC license. Start with the locomotive on the left and make your choices at each switch. The graphic itself is published under CC BY SA 3.0.
via Doug Belshaw
Liked Running against Tony Abbott in Warringah by Jane Caro (The Saturday Paper)
I’m not considering running for office because I have always dreamed of being an MP – although I don’t deny it would be interesting. I am thinking about it because I see it as a civic duty. I was brought up by parents who had lived in Manchester and London through World War II. They were adolescents at the time and have vivid and disturbing memories of the Blitz and of the revelations about Nazi death camps in the immediate aftermath of the war. It affected them profoundly. They brought me up to believe that bad things happen when good people stand by and do nothing.
Liked The bones that could shape Antarctica’s fate by Martha Henriques (bbc.com)
Archaeological discoveries can also boost political support for a case back home. "When remains or objects are found in the ice, I could see straight away it would inflate territorial nationalism," says Dodds. "Archaeology has always been really important for national politics." Other events, such as historic shipwrecks, could play a similar role as the Yamana skull. In 1819, the Spanish frigate San Telmo was wrecked in the Drake Passage, which separates the tip of Chile from the Antarctic Peninsula. Archaeologists have searched the Antarctic islands for signs of whether any crew made it alive to the shore.
Liked A Gradgrind ethos is destroying the school system | Simon Jenkins by https://www.theguardian.com/profile/simonjenkins (the Guardian)
Pisa, Whitehall and Ofsted are obsessed with maths not because algebra is the key to happiness, or geometry to great riches, but because it is easy to score globally. Bereft of an ideal of a good education, government, and especially central government, likes anything that yields mass data. It holds the key to control, to the regime of rewards and penalties that underpins modern administration and its funding.
Liked Google’s Reach into Classrooms (via NYT) by Kevin Hodgson
I am right now in the midst of teaching my sixth graders in a Digital Life unit, where we discuss and explore issues of privacy, identity, choices, and the ways corporations like Google are using our browsing histories and data to target us with advertising. You won’t find mention of that state of the modern day technology world in Be Internet Awesome.
Liked Building a portable modular synthesizer in a roller skate case by Chris Beckstrom
The cold weather has arrived which means it’s time to transition from mostly outdoor activity to mostly indoor activity. I’ve been working on some electronics projects, perhaps gearing up to sell some of my creations (stay tuned!). In the meantime, I’ve started working on a new modular synthes...