Liked Remember WordPress' Pingbacks? The W3C wants us to use them across the whole web by an author
the goal is to standardize a way to link together conversations across the web. A Webmention is a simple way to notify any URL when you link to it from your site. Consider this scenario: Alice publishes a blog post. Bob writes a response to Alice's post and links to it. On the web as it is today the only real way Alice ever knows about Bob's post is if someone tells her or if she sees incoming traffic in her logs.
Webmentions is a framework for connecting these two posts such that, if Alice's site accepts Webmentions, Bob's publishing software can automatically notify Alice's server that her post has been linked to in Bob's post.
Once Alice's site is aware of Bob's post, Alice can decide if she wants to show Bob's post as a comment on her site or link to it from her post – and if she responds with another post, then the conversation can continue.
Liked Dual Sim iPhone XS Max Review - 3 Months On
When the iPhones were announced last year I had decided before the event that I wasn't upgrading, and for a while after the event I held out - until I found out I could get a real dual sim iPhone XS Max from Hong Kong, which means no restrictions or modifications to iOS, and real dual sim capabilities. When it dropped in price a little I caved and flexed my credit card.
Liked 🗣Forgive fast, block even faster (and other rules) (The Discourse)

Below is an early attempt at an “Rules for Online Sanity” list. I’d love to hear what you think I missed.

  • Reward your “enemies” when they agree with you, exhibit good behavior, or come around on an issue. Otherwise they have no incentive to ever meet you halfway.
  • Accept it when people apologize. People should be allowed to work through ideas and opinions online. And that can result in some messy outcomes. Be forgiving.
  • Sometimes people have differing opinions because they considered something you didn’t.
  • Take a second.
  • There's always more to the story. You probably don't know the full context of whatever you're reading or watching.
  • If an online space makes more money the more time you spend on it, use sparingly.
  • Judge people on their actions, not their words. Don’t get outraged over what people said. Get outraged at what they actually do.
  • Try to give people the benefit of the doubt, be charitable in how you read people’s ideas.
  • Don’t treat one bad actor as representative of whatever group or demographic they belong to.
  • Create the kind of communities and ideas you want people to talk about.
  • Sometimes, there are bad actors that don’t play by the rules. They should be shunned, castigated, and banned.
  • You don’t always have the moral high ground. You are not always right.
  • Block and mute quickly. Worry about the bubbles that creates later.
  • There but for the grace of God go you.
via Kottke
Liked HEWN, No. 298 (Hack Education Weekly Newsletter)
Technologists suck at predicting the future. They suck because they don’t understand the past; they’re blind to much of the present. They’re terrible at predicting the future because they fail to grasp the systems and practices surrounding their products, firm in their faith instead that their own genius (and their investors’ continued support) will be enough to muddle forward.
Liked Designing for least knowledge by Jon UdellJon Udell
My hunch is that we’ll find ways to build profitable least-knowledge services once we start to really try. Successful examples will provide a carrot, but there’s also a stick. Surveillance data is toxic stuff, risky to monetize because it always spills. It’s a liability that regulators — and perhaps also insurers — will increasingly make explicit. Don’t be evil? How about can’t be evil? That’s a design principle worth exploring.