Bookmarked Podcasting Equipment Setup and Software I use on the 10-Minute Teacher by Vicki Davis (Cool Cat Teacher Blog)
I’ve been asked about the podcasting equipment setup and software that we use on the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast. After 220 episodes in one year and over 430K downloads, we’ve settled on a configuration we like. In this post, I’ll share the setup and help you get started.
I have collected a number of posts on podcasting before, however Vicki Davis definitely adds to the perspective.

via Stephen Downes

Bookmarked More on the Role of Audience in Social Spaces
We’ve got to stop telling people who are new to social spaces about the “power of audience” because the truth is that most of today’s audiences are muted at best, choosing consumption over participation in nine conversations out of ten.
Bill Ferriter questions the story that we keep on telling about audience and instead suggests three approaches that should be encouraged:

(1). Bring Your OWN Audience

Instead of trying to build a huge audience of strangers, concentrate on building a small audience of peers

(2). Be a Participating Member of Someone Else’s Audience

Start commenting on the work of others.  Start responding to people’s posts in Twitter.  Let people know that you are listening and learning from them.  Show gratitude for the time that they put into thinking and sharing transparently with others.  Provide challenge to their core ideas — and then push those ideas out through your networks.

(3). Draw attention to the ideas of your audience

I want you to think about my buddy Bob for a minute.  He took his own time to read my original bit on audience.  Then, he took even more of his own time to craft a reply that challenged my thinking and articulated concepts that I hadn’t considered. Instead of spending that same time on his own growth, he was making an investment in me and in our intellectual relationship. That matters, y’all — and I need to respect that investment in some way.


Ferriter has been writing a lot recently about reflection, audiences and comments. Personally, I have taken to being more intentional with my comments by sending comments from my own site. This has had its hiccups, but I think that it offers an alternative future and positive possibility.

Bookmarked The fate of the bitcoin-furious – unpopular opinions from a DLT faithful | BankNXT by Leda Glyptis (BankNXT)
I remember the day someone first explained bitcoin and the underlying technology to me. I remember who was doing the explaining, where I was and who else was there. I even remember what time of day it was and what I was wearing. I remember it with the clarity those life-altering moments have, becaus...
Leda Glyptis reflects on Bitcoin and shares three concerns:

  • Mate, you didn’t discover anything
  • Most of the people I speak to now hold bitcoin bought recently and think of it like day trading
  • We haven’t learned a thing
Bookmarked Why Are Our Most Important Teachers Paid the Least? (mobile.nytimes.com)
Many preschool teachers live on the edge of financial ruin. Would improving their training — and their pay — improve outcomes for their students?
Jeenen Interlandi provides a view into the problems associated with preschool in the USA:

Teaching preschoolers is every bit as complicated and important as teaching any of the K-12 grades, if not more so. But we still treat preschool teachers like babysitters.

This reminds me of the work of Bronwyn Hinz.

Via Ian O’Byrne’s TLDR Newsletter

Bookmarked Is everything you think you know about depression wrong? by Johann Hari (the Guardian)
It turns out if you have no control over your work, you are far more likely to become stressed – and, crucially, depressed. Humans have an innate need to feel that what we are doing, day-to-day, is meaningful. When you are controlled, you can’t create meaning out of your work. Suddenly, the depression of many of my friends, even those in fancy jobs – who spend most of their waking hours feeling controlled and unappreciated – started to look not like a problem with their brains, but a problem with their environments.
In this extract from Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions, Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 14 years, calls for a new approach.
Bookmarked Researching Your Own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing by CEM (eDirector's News)
One of the key ideas in Mason's book involves the pitfalls of teachers acting by routine only. Professionals become professionals, he acknowledges, by developing perceptions and skills, and by ‘routinising’ them. But Mason says that routines also deaden us. When things seem familiar and we react according to pattern or habit, we may not really be seeing what’s there. That means that we may not be doing as well as we might. The art of noticing is to keep open to new perceptions while standing on the base of skills, routines, and knowledge that enables us to function as well as we do. The discipline of noticing is to keep such noticing productive, and this is at the core of Mason’s agenda.
A short summary of Researching Your Own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing by John Mason
Bookmarked Google Maps’s Moat (Justin O’Beirne)
Google has gathered so much data, in so many areas, that it’s now crunching it together and creating features that Apple can’t make—surrounding Google Maps with a moat of time
Justin O’Beirne discusses the addition of ‘Areas of Interests’ to Google Maps. He wonders if others, such as Apple, can possibly keep up. The challenge is that these AOIs aren’t collected—they’re created. And Apple appears to be missing the ingredients to create AOIs at the same quality, coverage, and scale as Google.

O'Beirne's table demonstrating the difference between Google and Apple

Google’s is in fact making data out of data:

Google’s buildings are byproducts of its Satellite/Aerial imagery. And some of Google’s places are byproducts of its Street View imagery.

For a different take on Google Earth’s 3D imagery, watch this video from the [Nat and Friends]:

https://youtu.be/suo_aUTUpps

Bookmarked My favourite inquiry journeys of 2017.... (Kath Murdoch)
Using an inquiry based approach to teaching and learning is multi-faceted. At its heart, inquiry is a stance – it’s about how we talk to kids and how we think about learning. It is also about how we plan and the contexts we both recognise and create in which powerful inquiry can thrive. These contexts can be highly personal (one child’s investigation into their passion) and they can also be shared contexts that bring learners together under a common question. These shared inquiries form a powerful ‘backbone’ of the primary classroom.
Kath Murdoch stops and reflects on twelve inquiry projects that she has helped with in 2017. They include such questions as:

  1. HOW CAN WE DESIGN FOR OUR WELLBEING?
  2. WHAT MAKES A HEALTHY HABITAT?
  3. HOW CAN WE TEACH OTHERS ABOUT THIS SPECIAL PLACE?
  4. WHY DO PEOPLE PLAY?
  5. CAN WE CREATE OUR OWN RESTAURANT?
  6. BIN CHICKENS: WHAT’S THE PROBLEM?
  7. LET’S GET DOWN TO BUSINESS…WOULD YOU BUY THAT? WHY?
  8. WHY ARE MUSEUMS IMPORTANT – AND CAN WE CURATE OUR OWN?
  9. WHAT’S MY STORY – WHAT’S YOUR STORY?
  10. WHAT’S REALLY ON YOUR PLATE?
  11. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO ADAPT?
  12. WHY IS MUSIC IMPORTANT?

She pulls out some of the key aspects that went across all the different inquiries:

For the most part, the inquiries:

were authentic! Kids investigating something for a real purpose – with a genuine high-stakes outcome (often known from the outset)
were integrative. The journeys described allowed a range of learning areas to be meaningfully connected
involved experts from outside the school – this meant kids having to communicate with people in various fields
were shared – the learning gained from the inquiries went beyond the classroom and was shared with the wider community in some way
were emergent – these inquiries could not be planned in detail. The authentic nature of the journey meant that teachers and learners had to think on their feet and plan as the inquiry unfolded.
got kids out of the classroom visiting restaurants, going to the museum, the local nature reserve…many of these inquiries depended on experience beyond the classroom walls.
were often ‘design’ focussed.

This is not a list of questions and/or units to roll out, but rather a source of inspiration. Along with her post on ten practices of an inquiry teacher, they provide some guidance going into the new year.

Bookmarked Facial recognition's ominous rise: are we going too far too fast? (The Sydney Morning Herald)
This style of technology isn't new, but the method of its use - and the kinds of people wielding it - is.
This is a strange article documenting the rise of NEC. In it, Ben Grubb provides a range of examples, including Crown Casino tracking VIPs and Westfield estimating age, gender and mood. On the one hand it can be read as both being positive – which you would assume as the author’s expenses to iEXPO2017 were paid for by NEC – in that we can now do all these things with technology, but at the same time it asks the question as to whether we should? It reminds me in part of post discussing –Hitachi’s use of cameras to improve student life at Curtin University. My question is probably, “why would you?”.