Bookmarked How to get human time back from technology | NEXT Conference (NEXT Conference)
The addictive seductions of technology are limiting our creativity and potential , instead of enhancing it. Author Amber Case suggests how we can fix this by reclaiming human time, and keeping our phones in their place.
Amber Case provides some strategies to support users in being more mindful of their technology use:

  • Spend an hour a day without a device
  • Call instead of text
  • Pause before you react on social media
  • Install browser plugins to calm your web browsing experience
  • Improve Sleep Cycles and restore circadian rhythms
  • Defragment your brain through nature
  • Disable alerts on your phone
  • Create to do lists on paper

Some of this reminds me of Clay Shirky’s focus on awkward habits. That is one of the positives I have found about the IndieWeb. For more from Amber Case, listen to her Team Human interview.

via Adam Tinworth

Bookmarked Situating Student Hacking by Doug Levin (k12cybersecure.com)
When a student does cross the line, schools should consider long and hard whether the most appropriate response is to expel the student and criminalize that behavior versus viewing it as a unique teaching moment and a chance to shore up internal security practices. (Many organizations, in fact, pay good money for penetration testing services and/or offer bug bounties as part of their security compliance programs). Given the emphasis on STEM careers and the importance of computer science for the broader economy, it would seem that we’d want to embrace and channel the energies of those who show an interest and facility in computer operations…even when it may be in unanticipated ways.
Doug Levin reflects upon the state of hacking schools today. He provides a case study of a student from Michigan who through his own curiousity found various holes in his school’s structure, which he used to circumvent security and prank other classes. Although the easy option can be to make an example of such students, Levin argues that more proactive measures most be taken by districts in protecting data and security. For in the end digital security is a leadership issue.

Penalties and disciplinary actions for students who violate acceptable use policies are established, but what of the consequences to school districts. At what point could district leadership be considered negligent? What obligation do schools have to be forthright with their communities about their digital security shortcomings? How might schools react differently to these incidents, in ways that are more proactive and even humane? These are hard questions, no doubt, but given the frequency of ‘students hacking their schools’ incidents, I believe it is time we more forthrightly address this complicated issue.

It is interesting to consider this alongside Mal Lee and Roger Broadie’s work on digital trust.

Bookmarked Living In A Post Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram API World (apievangelist.com)
Kin Lane discusses the current move to lock down social media APIs. He suggests that this could all have been avoided by having clearer guidelines in the beginning. Here I am reminded of Bill Fitzgerald and Kris Shaffer’s discussion of bots.
Bookmarked It’s time to break up Facebook by Nilay Patel (The Verge)
"Start by breaking off WhatsApp and Instagram."
Nilay Patel explores the idea of reimagining anti-trust laws. At the moment there is too much grey for lawyers to argue about in regards to changes in price. Tim Wu and Hal Singer suggest that we need to think of anti-trust from the perspective of competition, not just cost. This is something that has been said about Google as much as Facebook. Cory Doctorow has also written about the problems big tech.
Bookmarked Remixer (remixer.visualthinkery.com)
This site allows you to add your own meaning to artwork by participating in it's remix. It's a collection of distinct visual apps. If you'd like to use REMIXER for your business, conference or campaign,
This is the project page for all of Bryan Mathers’ remix projects. I have tinkered with a few of these in the past:

However, I did not release how many others had been created, including an WWW EBI postcard, thrump card templates, meme generator and an open badge designer.

Bookmarked Melbourne moves underground | PROV (Public Records Office Victoria)
In 1969 a bold new vision for Melbourne’s public transport system was presented to the state government with a deadline for completion in mind; the year 1985. It’s not clear why the Melbourne Metropolitan Transportation Plan set its target date a modest 16 years past the publication of the plan. Perhaps to coincide with a mid 80s visit from Bruce ‘The Boss’ Springsteen when throngs of double denim fans would descend on the city and demand an efficient train ride? Whatever the reason, the public transport developments that emerged from that plan have more than outlasted the '80s rock star era, in fact, almost fifty years on and it continues to transport millions of Victorians in and out of the City every week.
A look at underground rail loop developed as a part of the Metropolitan Transportation Plan. Interesting to contrast this with the recent announcement of an outer loop.