Bookmarked Every School is a Good School | It's All About Learning (mepsprincipal.edublogs.org)
John Goh reflects on his experiences of the Singapore education system. He does so making comparisons with education in New South Wales. He touches on training, the structure of the day, doing less and lifelong learning. This provides a different perspective to Pak Tee Ng’s work.
Bookmarked TER #115 โ€“ Teaching Game Design with Bill Cohen โ€“ 22 July 2018 (Teachers' Education Review)

Timecodes

  • 00:00 Opening Credits
  • 01:31 Intro
  • 01:44 Selective Schools
  • 18:46 Feature Introduction
  • 20:31 Interview โ€“ Bill Cohen
  • 01:09:12 Sign Off
Cameron Malcher interviews Bill Cohen about game-design. Cohen goes beyond the usual coding and computer-aided approaches to focusing on ‘low-tech’ games. This included engaging with boardgames and outdoor games. This play-based approach focuses on developing clear metalanguage, feedback for mastery and working with an iterative design process. This reminds me in part of Amy Burvall’s notion of ‘rigorous whimsy‘ and BreakoutEDU. Some resources Cohen shared include Boardgame Geek and Lady Blackbird, while in a seperate post, Clare Rafferty has shared a list of games associated with History.

If there is one thing that I have learnt as a teacher is that nothing leaches out fun mor than dropping a layer of education over the top of it – Bill Cohen (50 mins)

Malcher also provides a reflection on the place and impact of select entry schools on equity and equality.

Bookmarked Mark Zuckerberg Is Doubly Wrong About Holocaust Denial by Yair Rosenberg (The Atlantic)
Truly tackling the problem of hateful misinformation online requires rejecting the false choice between leaving it alone or censoring it outright. The real solution is one that has not been entertained by either Zuckerberg or his critics: counter-programming hateful or misleading speech with better speech.
Yair Rosenberg touches on the dangers of simply suppressing disinformation. He explains that the only way to respond is to correct it. This continues some of the conversation associated with danah boyd’s keynote at SXSW.

via HEWN by Audrey Watters

Bookmarked โ€˜Nothing to worry about. The water is fineโ€™: how Flint poisoned its people by Anna Clark (the Guardian)

When the people of Flint, Michigan, complained that their tap water smelled bad and made children sick, it took officials 18 months to accept there was a problem.

Anna Clark provides a breakdown of the environmental disaster in Flint. Whether it be failure to deal with corrosion or the choice to change the water source, again and again the story comes back to money. It is a reminder that Adelaide’s water is not so bad after all.

What happened in Flint reveals a new hydra of dangers in civic life: environmental injustice, the limits of austerity, and urban disinvestment. Neglect, it turns out, is not a passive force in American cities, but an aggressive one.

Bookmarked 'Data is a fingerprint': why you aren't as anonymous as you think online by Olivia Solon (the Guardian)
More recently, Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye, a computational privacy researcher, showed how the vast majority of the population can be identified from the behavioural patterns revealed by location data from mobile phones. By analysing a mobile phone database of the approximate locations (based on the nearest cell tower) of 1.5 million people over 15 months (with no other identifying information) it was possible to uniquely identify 95% of the people with just four data points of places and times. About 50% could be identified from just two points.
Olivia Solon demonstrates some of the problems that we face with privacy. This touches on some of the challenges that Michael Golumbia addresses in his post on personal data. Both authors come to the same conclusion, we are expecting too much of the consumer.

via Ian O’Byrne

Bookmarked Susan Sontag: At the Same Time (review) (Radio National)

"To tell a story is to say: this is the important story. It is to reduce the spread and simultaneity of everything to something linear, a path.

To be a moral human being is to pay, be obliged to pay, certain kinds of attention.

When we make moral judgments, we are not just saying that this is better than that. Even more fundamentally, we are saying that this is more important than that. It is to order the overwhelming spread and simultaneity of everything, at the price of ignoring or turning our backs on most of what is happening in the world.

The nature of moral judgments depends on our capacity for paying attention โ€” a capacity that, inevitably, has its limits but whose limits can be stretched.

But perhaps the beginning of wisdom, and humility, is to acknowledge, and bow oneโ€™s head, before the thought, the devastating thought, of the simultaneity of everything, and the incapacity of our moral understanding โ€” which is also the understanding of the novelist โ€” to take this in."

In an extract from At the Same Time, Susan Sontag discusses storytelling and the art of leaving things out. I wonder if the same could be said of music? For example, in a documentary reflecting on U2’s album The Joshua Tree, Brian Eno demonstrates through the mixing board how they would could have mimicked Depeche Mode. Or maybe music too is simply a form of storytelling?

via Brainpickings

Bookmarked Blog Case Study: Student Run Newspaper by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
A student run newspaper is one type of blog that can offer many advantages for students. This post showcases an impressive newspaper run by the students atย Zurich International School in Switzerland (ZIS).
The Lion’s Journal is another example of a collaborative production to add to the many faces of blogging.
Bookmarked Facial-Recognition Systems Pitched as School-Safety Solutions, Raising Alarms by Benjamin Herold (Education Week)
"If we had a student who committed some type of offense against the code of conduct, we can follow that student throughout the day to see maybe who they interacted with, where they were prior to the incident, where they went after the incident, so forensically we could also use the software in that capacity as well," Rabey told the News in May.
Benjamin Herold reports on the introduction of facial recognition devices into schools. Many seem to be selling this as a means of creating a safe school environment. The concern raised by some is that this has not been thought out and until schools can actually think of a justified reason why then they should not engage with such technology, even if it is free.
Bookmarked Webmentions: Enabling Better Communication on the Internet by Chris Aldrich (alistapart.com)
Breaking down the walls between the internetโ€™s many social silos, Webmentions offer a new level of freedom for web interactions.
Chris Aldrich provides an introduction to webmentions. This includes unpacking the specification, the notion of mentions, the idea of kinds and way in which sites are potentially able to connect two-ways. This continues Aldrich’s efforts to document the IndieWeb, which has included a thorough overview of the IndieWeb and the future of feed readers. This introduction is different to Aaron Parecki’s guide to sending your first webmentions or breakdown of the oAuth standard.
Bookmarked 18 best practices for working with data in Google Sheets - Ben Collins (Ben Collins)
This article describes 18 best practices for working with data in Google Sheets, including examples and screenshots to illustrate each concept in action.
Ben Collins provides a guide for working with data in Google Sheets. Some of the useful steps that stood out wereย documenting the steps you take,ย adding an index column for sorting and referencing, creating named ranges for your datasetsย andย telling the story of one rowย to check the data. Another tip I picked up from Jay Atwood has been to import data, if moving from Excel to Sheets, rather than simply copying and pasting.