Bookmarked On Which Reading Program to Purchase by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
I was recently asked if I could give a 2-minute answer to which reading program would be best for a district. While I was flummoxed at first; 2 minutes, that’s not enough time to discuss the needed components?! I quickly realized that I really don’t need even two minutes to answer this question ...
In a recent post, Pernille Ripp addresses which reading program to choose. Rather than listing a range of programs, she provides a list of what should be included:

So what should we look for instead?

A program that supports choice, independent reading time, small group, one on one conferring, as well as lessons for ideas.

A program that focuses on the needs of the individual as much as the needs of the group.

A program that leaves teachers and students alike that reading and being a reader is something good.

A program that builds hope for all readers to be readers.  That balances out between reading for skill and reading for pleasure.  A program with an emphasis on developing reader identity as well as reader skill.  A program that doesn’t kill the love of reading but instead bolsters it.

That is the program you should buy.  And then don’t ever forget that fidelity should always remain to the students and not to the program itself to quote my Assistant Superintendent, Leslie Bergstrom.

I think that listing all of the different influences and attributes is so important. I have spoken about this elsewhere in regards to EdTech, using the Modern Learning Canvas to illustrate it. I have had a quick go at translating Ripp’s ideas here:

Modern Learning Canvas is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

Click here to make your own copy of the canvas

Bookmarked It’s Fun, It’s Here! Highlights Theme for WordPress (CogDogBlog)
The only place I ever saw Highlights for Children magazine was at my dentist office, a short distraction while waiting for the drilling and fat fingers of weird old Dr Cooper. The tagline of the magazine was “Fun With a Purpose”. But no connection here, except the name, it’s a brand new Word...
Alan Levine has pushed out another HTML conversion that reminds me a bit of Adobe Spark Pages. I think that I like it even more than the Big Picture theme that I used as a ‘home page’. The question I am left wondering about starting from scratch (or a basic starting block) is how hard it would be to bake in microformats or maybe the plugin is enough?
Bookmarked
Ben Williamson shares a request from his children’s school to provide a t-shirt to make a Growth Mindset cape. He unpacks this and shares his concerns about a focus on moral implications and economics deriving from the work of James Heckman.

Bookmarked Doing even better things by Dr Deborah M. Netolicky (the édu flâneuse)
I have begun to pare back my obligations. I have turned my email and social media notifications off and buried Facebook in the back of my phone. I’ve withdrawn from my Book Club. I’m reconsidering how often to post on this blog and am thinking perhaps ‘when it takes my fancy’ would be ok, rather than keeping myself to a schedule. I am figuring out how to protect my most productive time for my most important projects and how I might schedule in regular silence and stillness.
Deborah Netolicky reflects on her priorities as a part of her one word this year. She wonders about her choices. This has me reflecting on my own balances.
Bookmarked Something to look forward to by Austin Kleon (austinkleon.com)
I’d been struggling myself a bit with this re-read and Frankl’s emphasis on the future, how one must keep hope, keep his eye on the horizon. (Though I was particularly taken with his emphasis on imagination: how prisoners hold on by conjuring images of their loved ones, how a patient can sort out her decisions by pretending she’s lying on her death bed, looking back at her life.) I wondered how to reconcile Frank’s hopeful future-facing with my own feeling that life is more like Groundhog Day, and one should operate without hope and without despair.

A goal that isn’t too important makes you live in the moment, and still gives you a driving force. This driving force is a way to get around the fact that we will all die and there is no real point to life.

But with the ASG there is a point. It is not such an important point that you postpone joy to achieve it. It is just a decoy point that keeps you bobbing along, allowing you to find ecstacy in the small things, the unexpected, and the everyday.

What happens when you reach the stupid goal? Then what? You just find a new ASG.

Tamara Shopsin Arbitrary Stupid Goal

via Austin Kleon

Bookmarked Scripting News: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 (Scripting News)
Five years. Between 1994 and 1999, there was a brief period when the web was truly open. There was no one who could veto you. No one who, if they took offense to what you said or did, could knock you off the net. There were people who tried. That made it dramatic. But there was blue sky everywhere. Now the web is divided into silos controlled by big companies. A little bit of light shows through between the cracks. I keep hoping that one crack will open into a new world that's open where we can play where we have users to serve, and competitors to compete with. I go from slightly optimistic to get-a-clue-Dave-it-ain't-happening.
Winer remembers when the web was without silos who could control what we see or do. He wonders about finding cracks in today’s web to support such expression and experience once again. This reminds me of Chris Aldrich’s desire for a better web:

I’m not looking for just a “hipster-web”, but a new and demonstrably better web.

I wonder what part something like Micro.blogs could play with all this.

Bookmarked The Reputation Game by Ian Leslie (New Statesman)
Today, everyone’s second self is encoded in contrails of data: pictures, ratings, clicks, tweets, searches and purchases. Corporations and governments rake over this information and fix us in it: we are subjected to the scrutiny applied to celebrities but without the fame or the free stuff. In one possible future, everyone will be ranked like hotels on TripAdvisor. In one possible present, in fact: the Chinese government is implementing a scheme that will give each of its 1.4 billion citizens a score for trustworthiness, with the stated aim of building a culture of “sincerity”.
Ian Leslie looks into the question of reputation through the review of two books: Reputation: What It Is and Why It Matters by Gloria Origgi and The Reputation Game: The Art of Changing How People See You by David Waller and Rupert Younger. It is an interesting read, especially in light of everything about Harvey Weinstein and the media men list.
Bookmarked
Bret Victor argues that digital art needs to break with coding to create expressions that go beyond code and language. This is a fascinating presentation. I have postulated before of the idea of technology splitting music into its parts allowing users to not only listen, but also engage. This is something that Bjork explored with Biophilia.

Tom Woodward has captured a number of quotes from the presentation.

Bookmarked Thoughts as nest eggs (austinkleon.com)
By simply writing down a thought, you encourage more thoughts to come. When you have enough thoughts pushed together in the same space — a collage of thoughts, juxtaposed — they often lead to something totally new. This is the magic of writing.
Austin Kleon continues his reading of Thoreau, this time sharing a quote discussing the idea of writing as a way of rescuing thought. He extends with the idea of the ‘nest egg’, an idea that produces new (and original) ideas.