🤔 Citizen of the Indieweb?

I was looking around Github today at a few WordPress themes and plugins and I noticed Matthias Pfefferle’s profile in which he describes himself as a:

Citizen of the @indieweb

This made me wonder, when are you an actual ‘citizen’, that is when do you belong to, in or are a part of the Indieweb? Is it when you develop your user page? Is it when you check IRC/Slack Community regularly just because? Or is it when you have a site that has the badge on it? Or is is simple, are you a citizen if you want to be?

This reminded me of Audrey Watters reflections on the Contrafabulist podcast (can’t remember the exact episode) when she wondered when you actually become a New Yorker?

Listened CM 095: Olivia Cabane and Judah Pollack on Breakthrough Thinking from Curious Minds Podcast
Breakthroughs can take our work to new and exciting places, yet they rarely happen as often as we’d like. Are there ways to prompt these kinds of moments, so we can create them more often? Olivia Fox Cabane and Judah Pollack tell us how in their book, The Net and the Butterfly: The Art and Practice of Breakthrough Thinking.
There are four four types of breakthroughs: Eureka, Metaphor, Intuitive and Paradigm. Just as we build up resistance at a gym, Olivia Cabane and Judah Pollack talk about taking time to extend our neuroplasticity by breaking with our usual practices and embrace all the parts of the self. Three *super-tools* the authors talk about to support this include gratitude, altruism and meditation. In some ways this touches upon Doug Belshaw’s idea of [serendipity surface](http://discours.es/2016/increasing-your-serendipity-surface).
Bookmarked Factors that Influence Parental Views About Online Safety (Leif Rask)
In the end, it is up to you whether you believe that risks exist on the internet and whether they affect you. Personally, I hope that you will take a moment to understand how the internet works, and the risks involved for you and your children. I also hope that you will help your children to understand internet safety so that they are better prepared when you’re not around. I can’t tell you what to think and what to decide. I hope that you make an informed decision, a decision that helps your children lead safer lives.
Leif Rask provides a useful provocation in regards to online safety. It reminds me in part of watching Mr. Robot or Zeynep Tufekci’s work. My only concern is that it does not necessarily provide any sort of alternative. Maybe that would be a separate post? The hard thing is that there is no ‘informed’ choice that is magically the ‘right’ choice. I choose a self-hosted version of WordPress, is that worse than Rask’s choice to use WordPress.com? I realise that I may open myself up to more risks needing to manage my site, but the lessons learnt in doing this are priceless?
Liked PISA for personality testing – the OECD and the psychometric science of social-emotional skills by Ben Williamson (code acts in education)
SSES extends the reach of datafication of education beyond school walls into the surveillance of home contexts and family life, treating them as a ‘home learning environment’ to be assessed on how it enables or impedes students’ development of valuable socio-emotional skills

Ben Williamson provides a (very partial) overview of some of the key features of SSES. However, it does raise a few headline points:

SSES extends international-large scale assessment beyond cognitive skills to the measurement of personality and social-emotional skills

SSES will deliver a direct assessment instrument modelled on psychological personality tests

SSES enacts a psychological five-factor model of personality traits for the assessment of students, adopting a psychometric realist assumption that personality test data capture the whole range of cross-cultural human behaviour and emotions in discrete quantifiable categories

SSES extends the reach of datafication of education beyond school walls into the surveillance of home contexts and family life, treating them as a ‘home learning environment’ to be assessed on how it enables or impedes students’ development of valuable socio-emotional skills

SSES normalizes computer-based assessment in schools, with students required to produce direct survey data while also being measured through indirect assessments provided by teachers, parents and leaders

SSES produces increasingly fine-grained, detailed data on students’ behaviours and activities at school and at home that can be used for targeted intervention based on analyses performed at a distance by an international contractor

SSES involves linking data across different datasets, with direct assessment data, indirect assessments, school admninistrative data, and process metadata generated during assessment as multiple sources for both large-scale macro-analysis and fine-grained micro-analytics–with potential for linking data from other OECD assessments such as PISA

SSES uses digital signals such as response times and keystrokes, captured as process metadata in software log files, as sources for stealth assessment based on assumptions about their correlation with specific social-emotional skills

SSES promotes a therapeutic role for education systems and schools, by identifying ‘success’ factors in SELS provision and encouraging policymakers to develop targeted intervention where such success factors are not evident

SSES treats students’ personalities as malleable, and social-emotional skills as learnable, seeking to produce policy-relevant psychometric knowledge for policymakers to design interventions to target student personalities

SSES exemplifies how policy-relevant knowledge is produced by networks of influential international organizations, connected discursively and organizationally to think tanks, government departments and outsourced contractors

SSES represents a psycho-economic hybridization of psychological and psychometric concepts and personality measurement practices with economic logics relating to the management of labour market behaviours and human resources

Bookmarked Why I Follow Those Whom I Follow (and Why I Unfollow Those Whom I Once Followed) (dogtrax.edublogs.org)
Why do you follow or unfollow? Have you even ever thought about it?
Kevin offers an interesting reflection on following. I am particularly taken by Algot’s personal approach. I have reflected here, but basically I have cut back to those I have had some sort of interaction with.