Bookmarked Why Zuckerberg’s 14-Year Apology Tour Hasn’t Fixed Facebook (WIRED)
At a minimum, Facebook has long needed an ombudsman’s office with real teeth and power: an institution within the company that can act as a check on its worst impulses and to protect its users. And it needs a lot more employees whose task is to keep the platform healthier. But what would truly be disruptive and innovative would be for Facebook to alter its business model. Such a change could come from within, or it could be driven by regulations on data retention and opaque, surveillance-based targeting—regulations that would make such practices less profitable or even forbidden.
It is a little disconcerting when Facebook ever seems to do something positive for the ‘user’ in response to complaints. What is worse, Tufekci highlights how some of the changes they are promising now were promised years ago.

But the backlash wouldn’t die down. Attempting to respond to the growing outrage, Facebook announced changes. “It’s Time to Make Our Privacy Tools Easier to Find”, the company announced without a hint of irony—or any other kind of hint—that Zuckerberg had promised to do just that in the “coming few weeks” eight full years ago. On the company blog, Facebook’s chief privacy editor wrote that instead of being “spread across nearly 20 different screens” (why were they ever spread all over the place?), the controls would now finally be in one place.

Sadly, this has nothing to do with users or community:

As far as I can tell, not once in his apology tour was Zuckerberg asked what on earth he means when he refers to Facebook’s 2 billion-plus users as “a community” or “the Facebook community.” A community is a set of people with reciprocal rights, powers, and responsibilities. If Facebook really were a community, Zuckerberg would not be able to make so many statements about unilateral decisions he has made—often, as he boasts in many interviews, in defiance of Facebook’s shareholders and various factions of the company’s workforce. Zuckerberg’s decisions are final, since he controls all the voting stock in Facebook, and always will until he decides not to—it’s just the way he has structured the company.

Tim Wu argues that we need to replace Facebook with a trustworthy platform not driven by survelliance and advertising:

If today’s privacy scandals lead us merely to install Facebook as a regulated monopolist, insulated from competition, we will have failed completely. The world does not need an established church of social media.

📓 First Gutenberg Experience

I decided to finally install the Gutenberg plugin. I have read a few posts (Jeff Everhart and John Johnston) and realised that I probably should have a look.

My first impression was that it felt like the WordPress.com editor. I can see the appeal of blocks, it works for the new Google Sites and Weebly, but fear that it is overkill for what I do? I also noticed that Post Kinds disappeared.

Interestingly, in the screen providing a summary of all the posts, there is an option for starting a new post in the Gutenberg editor or the classic editor. Maybe this choice is an eye to the future, just wonder if there is a means of making ‘classic’ as default?


Some other reflections:

Replied to Issue #119 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by Ian O'Byrne (mailchi.mp)
TL;DR is a summary of all the great stuff I read so you don't have to...but I encourage it. Welcome to Issue #144. The Dalai Lama reminds us that "A lack of transparency results in distrust and a deep sense of insecurity."
Thanks Ian for the mention, thinking I should have put a bit more effort into the title of my post. Doesn’t exactly roll of the tongue. Glad you found it useful. There seems to be some complaints about SNAP, but I haven’t worked out the issue yet.

I am also in the process of adding my Facebook data to my site, however I think that is definitely a case of PESOS. This is all the otherside of the DoOO discussion.

Quoted Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being by Martin E. P. Seligman (via Google Books)

Along with creative developments in gaming, Facebook seems like a natural for measuring flourishing. Facebook has the audience, the capacity, and is building apps (applications) that speak to the development and measurement of well-being worldwide. Can well-being be monitored on a daily basis all over the world? Here’s a beginning: Mark Slee counted the occurrences of the term laid off in Facebook every day and graphed the count against the number of layoffs worldwide. Sure enough, they moved in lockstep. Not thrilling, you might think.

But now consider the five elements of well-being: positive emotion, engagement, meaning, positive relationships, and accomplishment. Each element has a lexicon; an extensive vocabulary. For example, the English language has only about eighty words to describe positive emotion. (You can determine this by going to a thesaurus for a word such as joy and then looking up all the related words, and then counting the synonyms of all those related words, eventually circling back to the core of eighty.) The hypermassive Facebook database could be accessed daily for a count of positive emotion words—words that signal meaning, positive relationships, and accomplishment—as a first approximation to well-being in a given nation or as a function of some major event.

It is not only measuring well-being that Facebook and its cousins can do, but increasing well-being as well. “We have a new application: goals.com,” Mark continued. “In this app, people record their goals and their progress toward their goals.”

I commented on Facebook’s possibilities for instilling well-being: “As it stands now, Facebook may actually be building four of the elements of well-being: positive emotion, engagement (sharing all those photos of good events), positive relationships (the heart of what ‘friends’ are all about), and now accomplishment. All to the good. The fifth element of well-being, however, needs work, and in the narcissistic environment of Facebook, this work is urgent, and that is belonging to and serving something that you believe is bigger than the self—the element of meaning. Facebook could indeed help to build meaning in the lives of the five hundred million users. Think about it, Mark.

Replied to
I love Zuckerberg’s positivity. Maybe with a bit more grit and determination he might find a few more million. Really must read The Circle again.
Replied to Microcast- Back In class by john john (John's World Wide Wall Display)
Some rather belated thoughts on returning to classroom teaching.
This is an interesting reflection John. Going back into the classroom is something that I aspire to do one day, but I fear how much muscle memory I may have lost. My saving grace is that my wife is a teacher and she keeps me grounded … Or at least tries.
Replied to Virtually the same? by Matthew Esterman (Medium)
What kind of learning experience can ‘other’ realities provide that our physical realities don’t? What effects will (dramatically) reduced cost and much more prolific access to VR equipment mean for schools? What professional learning will be required for teachers, parents and students to fully utilise these kinds of technologies? How do we ensure that we don’t just create a new method of information consumption but critical thinking, collaboration and creativity?
I have written about VR before, from the perspective of Google Cardboard. Some ideas that I thought of were as a means of supporting vocabulary, real life learning, telling stories and sparking curiosity. It is an interesting space.
Replied to HEWN, No. 259 by Audrey Watters (Tinyletter)
The question of whose story gets told is always an interesting one, I suppose, particularly in science and technology. And I can’t help but wonder not only what happened to Crowder but what’s going to happen to the (education) technologists of today. How will they be remembered? (And what are the archival materials we’ll turn to to study them?)
This is a really important point Audrey. I have been spending time collecting and curating what updates and information from Google and Hapara, two platforms that are at the core of our learning strategy. So often ‘updates’ come in the form of a revision of support material. There are no dates or details, just how tos. Even if they try to tell a story, this is often quite disparate.
Liked There's a soup of rubbish in the Pacific that's almost as big as Queensland (ABC News)
Whether you're focusing on count or mass, I think it is alarming and we all recognise that this is an increasing global project and it's going to take local solutions as well as hopefully global governance to help resolve the issues