Liked Why do people say things online they would never say face-to-face? (W. Ian O’Byrne)

I’m left wondering why someone would choose to share content like this openly online. I’m wondering why an individual would chose to share this type of content about a friend or family member. I’m wondering if the person thought that others would see it…or if we would see it. I wonder what the intended reaction to this comment should have been.

Bookmarked Some values-based career advice (Open Educational Thinkering)

Responding to a request for advice via blog post, instead of email.

Doug Belshaw provides some thinking and practice associated with getting the most out of your career. Although I have a few questions about opportunity and family, it is definitely a post worth reading and reflecting upon.

Marginalia

Your reactions tell people more about your character than your actions

When all is said and done, the person who holds you back the most in your life and career is… you

Once you’ve got that PhD or have worked for Google, people aren’t asking for ‘three years project management experience’, and the like.

Perhaps I’m becoming middle-aged, but it seems that a lot of the problems with today’s society is that people don’t stand for anything other than individualism and whatever late-stage capitalism can offer them.

There’s a reason I travel so much. It’s to meet new people, be exposed to ideas that might not always be shared online, and to experience places that open my mind. These days, we gain a competitive advantage by connecting the dots in new and novel ways. That depends, of course, on knowing where the dots are.

Replied to What would go into your Room 101? – Issue 101 – (Dialogic Learning Weekly)

My second contender is Effect Size. Unfortunately, this term suffers from the ignominy of Nominal Fallacy. We think we know what this means but it is much more complex. I have long been trying to wrap my head around the use of this statistical calculation in education. It seems to have taken root in our edu-speak, however, it looks like we are using it incorrectly.

I am pretty sure I misuse ‘effect size’.

Personally, I prefer ‘warm data’ that is embedded in context. I recommend the most recent episode of Team Human.

In regards to jargon, you might enjoy Diane Kashin’s discussion of ‘cute’.

Bookmarked Chilly Gonzales breaks down the essence of music (Huck Magazine)

Wearing a pale blue short-sleeved shirt, dark pants and white trainers, he immediately introduces himself as Jason. It feels like a subtle way of drawing a line between the persona of Chilly Gonzales – a wild-eyed ‘musical genius’ who wears a robe and slippers on stage, like a Bond villain enjoying some downtime – and Jason Beck, a mild-mannered music nerd born in Montreal back in 1972.

Whether it be his version of Daft Punk’s Too Long or contribution to Jamie Lidell’s work, I have always been fascinated with the work of Chilly Gonzales, long before I even knew who Chilly Gonzales was. This article from Cian Traynor provides an insight into the thoughts and actions behind the man. If you have not experienced the ‘genius’ before, I highlight recommend his masterclasses:

via Austin Kleon

Marginalia

Maybe changing attention spans are leading to new ways of listening but there are always going to be interesting artists who are able to see opportunities within that.

I sort of feel like, ‘Well, 10 million autotune fans can’t be wrong. Let me see if I can understand what’s happening here, what the aesthetics are.’ And if I spend enough time on it, I generally find some musical value
The fundamentals of musical storytelling are always going to be there: tension and release, fantasy and reality, sparseness versus denseness. These are the things that music has always been about, whichever culture or era you’re in. They’re still there. Everything gets flattened or compressed more, but that was already happening from the romantic era to the impressionist era

If you can steal without getting caught, then you’ve pulled off the perfect crime – which is what an artist is supposed to do. You’re not meant to come up with new things as an artist; no artist would say that’s what they do. It’s all about taking your influences and hopefully filtering them through a personal viewpoint

I’m all about letting the listener decide who fucked up and who was able to steal with finesse, you know? I mean maybe it’s different if you’re a struggling musician working your crappy day-job and you feel like some giant artist is profiting off something you did; I can imagine there’s a lot of emotional frustration there

Listened St. Vincent Details ‘Masseduction’ Redux LP ‘MassEducation’ by an author from Rolling Stone

When Annie Clark was mixing last year’s critically acclaimed Masseduction, she cut another version of the same album that she’s since dubbed MassEducation. The reworked LP, which will come out on October 12th, features only her on vocals and Thomas Bartlett on piano. She described the record in a statement as “two dear friends playing songs together with the kind of secret understanding one can only get through endless nights in New York City.”

I loved MassEduction, but the rawness of just voice and piano in this version of the album takes the music to a whole new level for me.
RSVPed Interested in Attending https://bryanalexander.org/book-club/our-next-book-club-reading-is-zeynep-tufekcis-twitter-and-tear-gas-the-power-and-fragility-of-networked-protest/

Our next book club reading has been decided! After a furious polling, the winner is…

…Zeynep Tufekci, Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest.

Listened Ep. 106 Nora Bateson “Warm Data” from teamhuman.fm

Playing for Team Human today is systems thinker, writer, and filmmaker Nora Bateson. Nora will be telling us how to stop looking at things as objects and begin seeing the spaces and connections between

In a discussion with Douglas Rushkoff, Nora Bateson discusses the concept of ‘Warm Data’ and the interconnected nature of everything.

“Warm Data” is information about the interrelationships that integrate elements of a complex system. It has found the qualitative dynamics and offers another dimension of understanding to what is learned through quantitative data, (cold data).(source)

For Bateson, it is the relationships which bring the data alive.

This stems from the notion of ‘warm ideas’, as idea that leads you into another idea of relations. In this circumstance it is about going beyond departments and instead focusing on context.

The underlying premise of the IBI is to address and experiment with how we perceive. Our mandate is to look in other ways so that we might find other species of information and new patterns of connection not visible though current methodologies. We call this information “Warm Data”.(Mission Statement)

I was not exactly sure what this all looks like in practice, but did take away that it was about working together.

Liked Understanding ‘Betweenness’ – seeing beyond the parts by jennymackness (Jenny Connected)

I suspect that any attempt to fully articulate and define what ‘betweenness’ might mean is going to fail, if only because, if it is embedded in experience, then it will necessarily be personal to each and every one of us. The nearest anyone I know has come to presenting a holistic view of ‘betweenness’ as expressed by McGilchrist is Matthias Melcher with this map

Listened CM 115: Steven Johnson on Making Decisions that Matter the Most from Curious Minds Podcast

What if you could make better decisions? Even with the biggest, life-altering choices, such as where to live, who to marry, or whether to start a company?

Steven Johnson, author of the book, Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions that Matter the Most, thinks we often face decisions like this with little to no training and that we could use more tools in our decision-making toolbox.

I am always captivated by Steven Johnson’s work. In his discussion with Gayle Allen he provides a number of tips and reflections the act of making a decision.
Replied to A Pedagogy of the Internet by Clint Lalonde (EdTech Factotum)

So, all this is to say, for me, the pedagogical piece that I am most interested in is what the open internet enables, and exploring what it means to participate in a meaningful way on the open, public internet. What are the challenges? What are the benefits? Why do I feel it is important that educators and students participate in these open spaces?

Your discussion here of online pedagogies reminds me of Chapter 2 of Anderson and Dron’s book Teaching Crowds. What it has me thinking is that different spaces are conducive to different pedagogical outcomes. I remember a few years ago asking someone from Google what their pedagogical stance was (I was thinking inquiry vs. instruction back then) and he stated that Google was not about deciding other people’s pedagogy. This may be true in part but if you look at there movement into transformation and subsequently online learning then the technology seems to produce certain outcomes.
Bookmarked Six myths about children in the digital age (Parenting for a Digital Future)

Today Sonia Livingstone is presenting on the panel at the Digital Families 2018 conference discussing the future for young people online – risks, opportunities and resilience. In this post Sonia ta…

Sonia Livingstone outlines six myths associated with children and their:

  1. Children are ‘digital natives’ and know it all.
  2. Parents are ‘digital immigrants’ and don’t know anything.
  3. Time with media is time wasted compared with ‘real’ conversation or playing outside.
  4. Parents’ role is to monitor, restrict and ban because digital risks greatly outweigh digital opportunities.
  5. Children don’t care about their privacy online.
  6. Media literacy is THE answer to the problems of the digital age.

She then highlights many of the contradictions associated with these beliefs. Along with the work of Alexander Samuel, Anya Kamenetz, Erika Christakis, danah boyd and Doug Belshaw, they provide a useful point of conversation and reflection.

via Doug Belshaw

Replied to The Spell of a Vanishing Loveliness — Cornelius (Duncan Stephen)

New Cornelius albums are few and far between. In fact, he has released just four albums in the past 21 years. But when one comes, it is always one of the highlights of the year. He is one of the most distinctive and innovative artists going. I have just listened to his latest album, Mellow Waves. This song isn’t the most sonically interesting on the album — but it is probably the best. It’s the only song on the album to feature mainly English lyrics, written and sung by Miki Berenyi, who was the singer in Lush.

I loved Point, but I struggled to really get into this album. You have encouraged me to give it a second go. I did enjoy the NPR Tiny Desk concert though.
Listened Listening and responding from Radio National

So if I were to give a down and dirty, so to speak, over what an effective listener is, it would be somebody that takes a step back, that allows the other to speak, that gives their full attention, that hears the message with their ears, with their heart, with their mind, with their emotional intelligence, that suspends judgement and makes a connection with the other individual

An interesting conversation on listening, lurking, reflecting and just being there.
Liked The breach that killed Google+ wasn’t a breach at all by Russell Brandom (The Verge)

The concern is less about a breach of information than a breach of trust. Something went wrong, and Google didn’t tell anyone. Absent the Journal reporting, it’s not clear it ever would have. It’s hard to avoid the uncomfortable, unanswerable question: what else isn’t it telling us?

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #168 (W. Ian O’Byrne)

Schools are increasingly looking for ways to secure their campuses while not making the school look like a prison encampment.

The progressive move to surveillance is concerning. Whether it be China’s use of social or the fictional representations by Genevieve Valentine featured in a recent Mozilla podcast. I really like Audrey Watters recent point about who and where:

Why windows? What kinds of windows? Which classrooms, whose classrooms have sunlight? Which doors have locks? Who has the key? Which schools have metal detectors? Which schools have surveillance cameras? When were these technologies installed, and why?

Replied to INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)

I had to go back to my Nexus 5x when my Pixel 2 broke on a recent trip. When I replaced it (had to take Pixel 2 XL) realized nothing in pixel lined justified the $600 price increase from the Nexus line.
Nexus 5X might be the last great phone

I really like Douglas Rushkoff’s point that the best mobile phone is the one you have. I still use my Nexus 6P and am happy with it.