Liked PLATO and the History of Education Technology (That Wasn't) (Hack Education)
The Friendly Orange Glow is a history of PLATO – one that has long deserved to be told and that Dear does with meticulous care and detail. (The book was some three decades in the making.) But it’s also a history of why, following Sputnik, the US government came to fund educational computing. Its also – in between the lines, if you will – a history of why the locus of computing and educational computing specifically shifted to places like MIT, Xerox PARC, Stanford. The answer is not “because the technology was better” – not entirely. The answer has to do in part with funding – what changed when these educational computing efforts were no longer backed by federal money and part of Cold War era research but by venture capital. (Spoiler alert: it changes the timeline. It changes the culture. It changes the mission. It changes the technology.) And the answer has everything to do with power and ideology – with dogma.
Bookmarked Doing even better things by Dr Deborah M. Netolicky (the édu flâneuse)
I have begun to pare back my obligations. I have turned my email and social media notifications off and buried Facebook in the back of my phone. I’ve withdrawn from my Book Club. I’m reconsidering how often to post on this blog and am thinking perhaps ‘when it takes my fancy’ would be ok, rather than keeping myself to a schedule. I am figuring out how to protect my most productive time for my most important projects and how I might schedule in regular silence and stillness.
Deborah Netolicky reflects on her priorities as a part of her one word this year. She wonders about her choices. This has me reflecting on my own balances.
Liked Microblogging by Paul Robert Lloyd
Maybe a growing disillusion with social networks and the recent resurgence in blogging will bring with it an interest in these newer IndieWeb standards. I’d love to see more consumer-oriented publishing tools adopt MicroPub and Webmention so that their empowering capabilities become available to all. And it’d be great to see competitors to Micro.blog, each with their take on how to fix the problems we’ve uncovered during our embrace of social media. We have the technology; we just have to use it.
Bookmarked Something to look forward to by Austin Kleon (austinkleon.com)
I’d been struggling myself a bit with this re-read and Frankl’s emphasis on the future, how one must keep hope, keep his eye on the horizon. (Though I was particularly taken with his emphasis on imagination: how prisoners hold on by conjuring images of their loved ones, how a patient can sort out her decisions by pretending she’s lying on her death bed, looking back at her life.) I wondered how to reconcile Frank’s hopeful future-facing with my own feeling that life is more like Groundhog Day, and one should operate without hope and without despair.

A goal that isn’t too important makes you live in the moment, and still gives you a driving force. This driving force is a way to get around the fact that we will all die and there is no real point to life.

But with the ASG there is a point. It is not such an important point that you postpone joy to achieve it. It is just a decoy point that keeps you bobbing along, allowing you to find ecstacy in the small things, the unexpected, and the everyday.

What happens when you reach the stupid goal? Then what? You just find a new ASG.

Tamara Shopsin Arbitrary Stupid Goal

via Austin Kleon

Bookmarked Scripting News: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 (Scripting News)
Five years. Between 1994 and 1999, there was a brief period when the web was truly open. There was no one who could veto you. No one who, if they took offense to what you said or did, could knock you off the net. There were people who tried. That made it dramatic. But there was blue sky everywhere. Now the web is divided into silos controlled by big companies. A little bit of light shows through between the cracks. I keep hoping that one crack will open into a new world that's open where we can play where we have users to serve, and competitors to compete with. I go from slightly optimistic to get-a-clue-Dave-it-ain't-happening.
Winer remembers when the web was without silos who could control what we see or do. He wonders about finding cracks in today’s web to support such expression and experience once again. This reminds me of Chris Aldrich’s desire for a better web:

I’m not looking for just a “hipster-web”, but a new and demonstrably better web.

I wonder what part something like Micro.blogs could play with all this.

Listened Micro.blog on Social Media with Manton Reece from GeekSpeak a Podcast with Lyle Troxell
We have been talking about the problems with Twitter, Facebook, and social media throughout the last year. Our guest has too, and he's trying to do something about it. Manton Reece, talks about Micro.blog, the technology it is built on, and how he is being thoughtful about building something new. - GeekSpeak Podcast for 2018-01-19
For so long I have looked on at Micro.blog. I was unsure whether I wanted to pay as I was unsure what I would be paying for and have been looking for a proper breakdown of the platform. John Johnston has been helpful, but but I still had questions. Manton Reece provides many of these answers in his appearance on the Geek Speak podcast. This included the difference between hosting and self-hosted, why it is different to other platforms, as well as how it fits in with the #IndieWeb. It is impetus I needed to dig deeper, especially as a means for comment and engaging with others.

via John Johnston

Replied to Notes for #NetNarr by Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog  Alan Levine aka CogDogProfile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog Alan Levine aka CogDog (CogDogBlog)
I’ve been using this tool for years in Feed WordPress set ups. A common mistake, and it happened to 2 students this time around, is when I ask for the link to their blog, I get one that is actually the link to their dashboard view of their own blog, like It’s a subtle thing, but this is not the public URL of a blog. It works for them because they are logged into their own blogs. Anyhow, I added a few more checks on the Magic Box code to trap these errors (you can see a public version at http://lab.cogdogblog.com/magicbox/).
Alan, I threw a few links into the Magic Box (on the CCourses page) recently as I was just testing out a few things. I found that even though Post Kinds produces a feed, the box was not picking this up and instead giving me back the basic feed for the whole site. Just thought I’d share …
Listened
Cameron Malcher interviews Massimo Pigliucci about Stoicism and its place within education.

00.00 Opening Credits
01:31 Intro
03:16 Ben Newsome – Fizzics Ed Podcast
11:19 Pasi Sahlberg on NAPLAN
17:39 Discussing disparity of school resources
21:28 Feature Introduction
24:02 Interview – Massimo Piglucci
1:19:05 Quote & Sign Off

Watched

The Webby Award-winning PS22 Chorus was formed in the year 2000. We are an ever-changing group of 5th graders from a public elementary school in Staten Island, New York. PS22 is NOT a “school for the arts,” and the chorus is not a magnet program. PS22 Chorus just features ordinary children achieving extraordinary accomplishments — musically and otherwise.