Bookmarked Quincy Jones on the Secret Michael Jackson and the Problem With Modern Pop (Vulture)
Music legend Quincy Jones on who he thinks killed JFK, the secret Michael Jackson, his relationship with the Trumps, and the problem with modern pop.
In this interview, Quincy Jones touches on a number of points, including Michael Jackson the Beatles and Marlon Brando. However, what stood out to my was his take on modern pop:

Do you hear the spirit of jazz in pop today?
No. People gave it up to chase money. When you go after Cîroc vodka and Phat Farm and all that shit, God walks out of the room. I have never in my life made music for money or fame. Not even Thriller. No way. God walks out of the room when you’re thinking about money. You could spend a million dollars on a piano part and it won’t make you a million dollars back. That’s just not how it works.

Is there innovation happening in modern pop music?
Hell no. It’s just loops, beats, rhymes and hooks. What is there for me to learn from that? There ain’t no fucking songs. The song is the power; the singer is the messenger. The greatest singer in the world cannot save a bad song. I learned that 50 years ago, and it’s the single greatest lesson I ever learned as a producer. If you don’t have a great song, it doesn’t matter what else you put around it.

Bookmarked Many More Webs Bite The Dust (CogDogBlog)
Three years after publishing the first version of Another Web Bites The Dust (35 corpses), it was time to update, and add 24 more dead web sites to the video.
Alan Levine adds to his lists of web sites that have been shut down. Attached to this is a video montage:

Only a day later and another site has already been added, Wikispaces.

Liked Screen Time by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
Screen time isn’t a single thing. It’s an insane range of things. There’s lots of screen time that is of Twinkie quality but there are many other options. If I read a book on a device is it screen time or is that reading? If I’m coding for an hour? Editing video? Video chat with my parents? When we reduce things to this extent we end up doing things that ignore the actual problem.
Bookmarked The cult of Mary Beard – podcast by an author (the Guardian)
How a late-blossoming classics don became Britain’s most beloved intellectual
An intriguing insight into the life and times of Mary Beard. A classicist who has made her name as a popular intellect. Full of wit, there were two quotes that really struck me. One was about the supposed ‘logical’ path to a career:

Her career stands, in a way, as a corrective to the notion that life runs a smooth, logical path. “It’s a lesson to all of those guys – some of whom are my mates,” she said, remembering the colleagues who once whispered that she had squandered her talent. “I now think: ‘Up yours. Up yours, actually.’ Because people’s careers go in very different trajectories and at very different speeds. Some people get lapped after an early sprint.” She added softly, with a wicked grin: “I know who you are, boys.”

The other was on the lessons learnt about understanding the ‘Classics’:

This approach was neatly displayed in her bestselling history of Rome, SPQR (2015). The early history of Rome, the era of its fabled seven kings, is notoriously difficult to untangle. There are few, if any, contemporary sources. The whole story slides frustratingly away into legend, with the later Romans just as confused as we are about how an unremarkable town on a malarial swamp came to rule a vast empire. One way of handling this material might have been simply to have started later, when the historian’s footing among the sources becomes more secure. Instead Beard asked not how much truth could be excavated from the Romans’ stories about their deep past, but what it might mean that they told them. If the Romans believed their city had started with Romulus and Remus, with the rape of the Sabine women – in a welter, in other words, of fratricide and sexual violence – what can we learn about the tellers’ concerns, their preoccupations, their beliefs? According to Greg Woolf, “One of the things Mary has taught is to look at the window, not through it, because there isn’t really anything behind it.

For a text version, go here.

Liked a post (colinwalker.blog)
Right and true are formed by consensus - some will align with me, others with John, but when true consensus cannot be achieved we are left with opinion. That's fine, we seek opinions to educate ourselves and to gain affirmation of our own, but when we blindly reject those that don't provide that affirmation we tread a slippery slope.
Replied to Facebook, Medium, And Staying The Course Within Your Own Domain (kinlane.com)
We all want more traffic, readers, and hopefully revenue around our work. It is always tempting to think the grass is greener on another platform. However, we should never lose sight of the importance of owning, operating, and cultivating our own domain. There will always be new platforms who come along and prey upon our desire for more traffic, and the magical network effects they will bring, but it will NEVER be worth abandoning our own domain. Platforms come and go, pivot, shift courses, and rarely will think of you as more than just a data point. Nobody will ever care as much about your content, data, and audience as you do, and I’m hoping folks are starting to learn their lesson after the whole Facebook bullshit.
Great post Kin. Personally, I have really enjoyed digging into the #IndieWeb and taking my blogging and experience with –domains even further. One of my frustrations with Medium is the lack of webmentions. I can understand why – all about the eyeballs – and I do not agree. Like yourself, there are some random posts I POSSE there, but most of the time stay away.

The other half of the conversation is the functionality provided on Medium. If people want ‘annotations’, they can use things like Hypothes.is, if they want to provide the options to link, they can add fragmentions, while there are many themes that provide similar look and feel. To be honest, I think that Hackeducation.com is one of the cleanest reading experiences.

Although third-party applications make it ‘easy’ to sharecrop, the question is at what cost?

Replied to Using Flickr to embed images (Meredith Fierro)
I stumbled across this solution when I was quickly reaching my storage quota for my website during ds106. I needed a way to upload all the images I created and didn’t have enough room on my website. So I thought I would show you all how simple it is to embed the images in posts and pages.
I have used Flickr for embedding images for a while. One challenge I have had is with featured images. I used to use a plugin that made the first embedded image the feature, but it stopped working, so now I manually upload. Not sure if you any thoughts for that?

My other concern is what might happen if Flickr were to flop or be sold off? What would happen in that situation?

Listened 047: The Web is Neither Good or Bad…nor is it Neutral. It’s an Amplifier with Jeremy Keith from User Defenders Podcast
Jeremy Keith reveals how the web is neither good or bad, nor neutral, but an amplifier. He inspires us to not let the future be just something that happens to us, but rather something we make with the small things we do today. He encourages us to build software ethically with our users’ psychological vulnerabilities in mind. He motivates us to not build on rented land, but to publish using the superpower of our own URLs. He also shows us how looking to the past is just as important as looking to the future.
Here is a breakdown of the episode:

  • Iron Man Photo Story (4:43)
  • On Net Neutrality (13:31)
  • What’s “Adactio”? (20:44)
  • Is the Internet Good or Evil? (24:41)
  • Hippocratic Oath for Software Designers (35:51)
  • Resilient Web Design (49:06)
  • Why do you Love the Web so Much? (54:26)

The best of the web is people sharing what they know

  • The Power and Generosity of the Community (63:05)
  • What Comes Next? (71:34)
  • Listener Question? (73:44)
  • Last Words to the Builders of the Web (74:18)
Replied to Not Dead, Just Hibernating (colinwalker.blog)
Maybe it's just because I have put myself in a particular position - with micro.blog and the Indieweb movement - but I see a thriving community of individuals, bloggers, looking to retake control of their online presence.Adam described the interview as "hard going" and on my first read though I only got as far as the following quote about talking to a high school class: "When they ask...
I wasn’t there in the halycon days and only really started blogging after blogging supposedly died, but I like your point Colin about hibernation. I POSSE now, but I imagine a movement where people use their blogs to connect and communicate with other blogs.