Liked ClassDojo poses data protection concerns for parents by Ben Williamson (Parenting for a Digital Future)
It is time to support parents and teachers to ask critical questions about ClassDojo. As the owners and controllers of a vast global database of children’s behavioural information and a global social media site for schools, its entrepreneurial founders need to be more transparent about what they intend to do with that data, how they intend to generate income from it, and how they want ClassDojo to play a part in interactions between children.
I have been thinking a bit about technology lately and how we define it. This short reflection is inspired in part by Audrey Watters, Marten Koomen and Ben Williamson. In the end, technology comes in many shapes and sizes.

Replied to Re-thinking the Homepage by Eddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)
This is definitely not the end of my site revisions, it’s really just the start. But it allows me to use this for awhile and see what I like and don’t like.
I really like the look of this Eddie. I have always looked on at Chris Aldrich’s site and felt that it was a little bit beyond what I was after. However, you provide a different approach and show how it may not need to be so complicated. I do however like Aldrich’s breakdown of the different Post Kinds as a sort of menu.
Replied to Freeing Myself from Facebook by Jonathan LaCourJonathan LaCour (cleverdevil)
Ever since my discovery of the IndieWeb movement, I've wanted to free myself from Facebook (and Instagram) and their brand of surveillance capitalism. I want to own my own data, and be in control of how it is shared, and I don't want it to be used for advertising.
Jonathon, there are many posts out there arguing to get off Facebook or clean up your data, however my question has always been what to do with the data. I really like Martin Hawksey’s work associated with archiving Twitter, but I have never really come upon any process for bringing Facebook content into my own domain. I am going to explore this, even if to keep a private archive. Thanks you.
Liked Publishers and Platforms Need to Label Genres. Now, Please. by mikecaulfield (Hapgood)
It’s true that people do like having a standard interface for the feed, but the feed needs to figure out ways to parse this information and add the genre labels and indicators back in ... The fact that it is 2018 and we’re still having this conversation is bizarre
Replied to Thoughts on linkblogs, bookmarks, reads, likes, favorites, follows, and related links (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
How I view these content types on my personal website/online commonplace book.
This is a useful reflection Chris. I find the correlation with social media spaces interesting. For example, what maybe a clap in one space maybe a star in another. I have down the path of organising my space around contributions, creations and response.

In regards to ‘responses’ I have discussed my different uses before. Basically, they follow the structure of Post Kinds, but there are times when I break them down further using tags:

  • πŸ“‘ / Bookmarks: Used for posts of interest, with added commentary and quotes added.
  • πŸ‘ / Likes: Used for links that I have little to say about, but want to like. The same as a +1 on Google+ or a star on Mastodon.
  • πŸ€” / Questions: A cross between a bookmark and a reply, questions are used as a means of posing wonderings and what ifs.
  • πŸ’¬ / Replies: Although in part serving the same purpose as a bookmark, replies allow for an interaction with the author.
  • πŸ“š / Reads: Used to collect together marginalia associated with books. I usually just bookmark articles.
  • 🎧 / Podcasts: Similar to a bookmarks and likes, this indicates podcasts.i haved listened to and engaged with.
  • 🎡 / Music: This is for reviews and reflections on music.
  • πŸ“Ί / Watched: Used for video I have watched, particular online. Although these are sometimes kept as bookmarks when they involve mixed media.
  • πŸ“° / Newsletters: My newsletter provides an opportunity to review the various bookmarks saved throughout the month. Although this could be automated using a platform like MailChimp (as Doug Belshaw does), I choose to do this manually and further add to my commentary.

I must admit that I am always making minor changes. It is far from set.

Bookmarked Social Inequality Will Not Be Solved By an App by Safiya Umoja Noble (WIRED)
The entire experiment of the internet is now with us, yet we do not have enough intense scrutiny at the level of public policy on its psychological and social impact on the public.
In an excerpt from Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism, Safiya Umoja Noble highlights the part that technology plays in reinstating inequality and oppression. This is a topic that Cathy O’Neil touches on in her book Weapons of Maths Destruction. One point that stood out was the ability to use algorithms to find the ‘best’ school:

These data-intensive applications that work across vast data sets do not show the microlevel interventions that are being made to racially and economically integrate schools to foster educational equity. They simply make it easy to take for granted data about β€œgood schools” that almost exclusively map to affluent, White neighborhoods. We need more intense attention on how these types of artificial intelligence, under the auspices of individual freedom to make choices, forestall the ability to see what kinds of choices we are making and the collective impact of these choices in reversing decades of struggle for social, political, and economic equality. Digital technologies are implicated in these struggles.

Another introduction to Noble’s book is her video, found here.

Listened The fascist movement that has brought Mussolini back to the mainstream – podcast by Tobias Jones from the Guardian
Italy’s CasaPound has been essential to the normalisation of fascism again in the country of its birth
We live in interesting times, especially in light of the recent EngageMOOC exploring the topic of polarisation.

You can read the text version here

Replied to Memento Mori: Learning about life, by knowing you will die (W. Ian O'Byrne)
One of the things that I do believe, and most people do not understand, is that most of the wonderful things I have in my life are present because of my mother’s death. Most of my large family comes from my father remarrying. Events in my life have unfolded to put me in certain places in certain times.
Sorry to hear your loss Ian.

I really enjoyed your reflectoon. It has certainly led me to think a little more deeply. I was particularly taken by your point about your mother’s death defining you in so many ways. I think that can also be said about a lot of those life choices not just death. Being the grandson of a European refugee who fled Communist Czechoslovakia, I am often left wondering what if, only to realise that there is no what if, just what.

Thanks you again for sharing.

Aaron

Listened IRL Podcast Episode 12: Algorisky from irlpodcast.org
On this week's episode of IRL, we sit down with Luke Dormehl, author of Thinking Machines and The Formula, to explore the impact of algorithms, on and offline. Staci Burns and James Bridle , author of "Something is wrong on the internet," investigate the human cost of gaming YouTube recommendations. Anthropologist Nick Seaver talks about the danger of automating the status quo. And researcher Safiya Noble looks at how to prevent racial bias from seeping into code