Can you remember the route by which you came to use Twitter to support your professional learning?

In a recent response to Ian Guest, I spoke about a beginning to getting onto Twitter. After reading Ian’s reply, I realised I may have been ignoring the wild goose chase …

For more than ten years I have been publishing blog posts on at least 360 of the 365 days in a year. The “secret” has been to just make it a priority every day. There have been stretches where for it’s a struggle and there have been stretches when it’s “easy.” The “easier” stretches always come when I get up early in the morning. I don’t like getting up at 4am, but it makes the writing come easier and then I don’t have to worry about it for the rest of the day.
Richard Byrne

A reflection about what goes into writing a blog …

Imagine a technology world that’s more intrusive, more prone to failure, and more powerful.Β  We access the internet in ways that compromise our privacy, make us vulnerable to threats, and divide us from each other. Bryan Alexander

I was recently offered a voucher for free parking in the city, all I had to do was sign up. This led me to think about why we take up technology and at what cost.

Complexity and the Collapse of Western Civilisation

Rachel Nuwer makes some predictions about the collapse of Western Civilisation. One of the points that she makes is the challenge of ‘complexity’:

According to Joseph Tainter, a professor of environment and society at Utah State University and author of The Collapse of Complex Societies, one of the most important lessons from Rome’s fall is that complexity has a cost. As stated in the laws of thermodynamics, it takes energy to maintain any system in a complex, ordered state – and human society is no exception. By the 3rd Century, Rome was increasingly adding new things – an army double the size, a cavalry, subdivided provinces that each needed their own bureaucracies, courts and defences – just to maintain its status quo and keep from sliding backwards. Eventually, it could no longer afford to prop up those heightened complexities. It was fiscal weakness, not war, that did the Empire in. source