Bookmarked Rediscovering the Small Web (neustadt.fr)
Parimal Satyal explores the world of the small web. This starts with a history of the web and the creation of spaces using HTML and CSS, where you depended on linking between and to different sites to navigate around. This is in stark contrast to the commercial web that is organised around products and optimised search. For Satyal, the modern web of marketing loses much of the creativity of the early days.

As fun as it is to explore what’s out there, the best part is really to join in and make your own website. Not on closed platforms or on social media mediated by ad companies, but simply in your own little corner of the web. It’s the best way to see how simple and open the web really is.

You could easily put up those drawings you’ve been making, share your thoughts and ideas, or reviews of your favourite whiskys. Make a website to share your writing tips or your best recipes. Or a list of your favourite addresses in your city for travelers who might be visiting.

It is interesting to read this along side Eevee’s dive into the world of CSS, Charlie Owen’s call to return to the beauty and weirdness found in the early web and Kicks Condor’s discussion of what we left in the old web. I was also left thinking again about Tom Critchlow’s discussion of small b blogging. It would seem that Facebook recognises the lack of creativity associated with the modern web with its latest experiment. and creativity

via Alan Levine

Listened Product Hunt Radio | The dark side of the web w/ Anil Dash and Allison Esposito | Episode 134 by Ryan Hoover from Product Hunt Radio

On this episode we’re joined by Anil Dash and Allison Esposito. Anil is CEO of Glitch, a friendly community where developers build the app of their dreams. Allison founded Tech Ladies, a community that connects women with the best jobs in tech.

We reminisce about the good ol’ days of IRC, Friendster, AIM, and MySpace. A lot has changed since then, yet they continue to exhibit some of the same dynamics and challenges of today’s massive social networks. We also talk about the challenges of building a healthy community on the internet in a time when careers and reputations can be destroyed in an instant. Of course, weโ€™ll also cover some of our favorite products that you might not know about.

Ryan Hoover speaks with Anil Dash and Allison Esposito about the web. They discuss some of the history, what their involvement has been and thoughts moving forward. Some of the interesting points discussed were:

  • The Challenge of community verses team
  • Going to where the people are (Facebook) verses creating a new space

Marginalia

Thereโ€™s something about community that if youโ€™re doing it right, it should feel like a mix of it just happened and itโ€™s natural. โ€“ Allison

It turns out the hosting of the video wasnโ€™t the thing, the community is the thing and it has a value. Whether you create an environment that you feel people can express themselves in is a rare and special and delicate thing. โ€” Anil

via Greg McVerry

Bookmarked ISP Column – June 2018 (potaroo.net)

Huston’s analysis steps through the seven layers in the OSI stack, beginning with changes in the physical infrastructure (massive improvements in optical signalling, more and better radio, but we’re still using packet-sizes optimized for the 1990s); then the IP layer (we’re still using IPv4!); routing (BGP is, remarkably, still a thing — on fire, all the time); net ops (when oh when will SNMP die?); mobile (all the money is here); end-to-end transport (everything is about to get much better, thanks to BBR); applications (Snowden ushered in a golden age of crypto, CDNs are routing around stupid phone companies, and cybersecurity is a worse dumpster fire than even BGP) and the IoT (facepalm).

This report into the web is intriguing and interesting to compare with James Bridle’s discussion of infrastructure and the impact of global warming on things.

via Boing Boing