Greg McVerry asked about using Micro.blog with WordPress.

I would recommend using a tag as a trigger. Therefore, students add say ‘microblog’ or ‘mb’ as a tag and it would get pushed through. Then you can decide if you include a title or not to decide short or long post.

In the case of a titleless post, I have taken to using the slug to explain the post.

I am really interested in the possibilities of using Micro.blog with something like Edublogs.

Microcast #012 - A reflection on whether space matters?

Microcast #012 – A reflection on whether space matters?

I myself, have taught a class of 230 children and I had to teach under a tree because there was no classroom.
Esnart Chapomba

I was recently challenged on the place of space in regards to learning.

Replied to 30 and Counting, Episode 5: Leaving Facebook... and replying over email? (30andcounting.me)

In this episode, I talk about my plans to leave Facebook and how I plan to in some ways replace it with a monthly newsletter. Then I brainstorm about how to receive replies and reactions from it.

I really like this idea Eddie. I guess it builds on the idea of creating custom web actions? I am not sure I would necessarily know where to start but interpreted that it is in part built around information in the URL. I currently use Tinyletter and haven’t explored MailChimp completely, but is this solution built into the template or your original posts?

Look forward to following your journey.

Bookmarked
This call for a ‘review’ has sparked a range of responses. One of the focuses seems to be strip the curriculum ‘back to basics’. I am interested in Professor Geoff Masters role in leading the review:

The NSW Education Standards Authority would engage Professor Geoff Masters from the Australian Council for Education Research to lead the review.

He said the review would look at implementation issues and look for ways to declutter and simplify the curriculum.source

Time will tell what this review will actually provide. As a Victorian, it is interesting to watch from afar.

Creativity Tips #9: The IKEA Effect and Meraki
In this creativity tip, Amy Burvall talks about the idea of doing enough to feel that you have played a part in the process. This is called the ‘IKEA Effect’s, after the company that has made its name supporting people in the construction of flatpacked creations.

The IKEA effect is a cognitive bias in which consumers place a disproportionately high value on products they partially created.source

For me, this is what makes the #IndieWeb (and DoOO) special. It provides the tools and techniques to make and manage your own creations on the web, without starting from scratch.

Replied to Creativity Tips Vlog Series: 1-10 #LDvid30 (AmusED)
Thanks to the inspiration of @karenmolonely of Sydney and my friend Helen Blunden of Melbourne Iโ€™ve taken up the challenge of recording a short (under 3 min) video each day and contributing tโ€ฆ
I love this Amy. It reminds me of microcasts. The rawness and reflective nature. I am also reminded of George Couros’ idea of #EDUin30 based on Twitter’s constraint of 30 seconds.

Another thing you could do is add your videos to Huffduffer using Ryan Barrett’s bookmarklet for video. This would allow you to create a quasi-podcast from your vlogs, although it would be temporary as Barrett only holds the audio stripped from YouTube for 30 days. It is a start though.

Replied to Issue #149 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by an author (TLDR)
Interesting view from Tom Hulme of Google Ventures arguing that teaching kids to code isnโ€™t the future proofed ticket to future jobs as framed by many people. Deep machine learning will likely automate the writing of code relatively quickly. Creativity is going to be far more important in a future where software can code better than we can.
Wondering Ian if ‘coding’ can actually be a part of creativity? In my current work, I need to think creatively to design a solution that can accommodate a number of scenarios and situations, while at the same time being relatively simple. For me, this is about working within the constraints. I may not know how to code my solutions, but I am not going to buy a future where I have no knowledge of the way things work. I work with too many people who think they can make decisions (creative or critical) without understanding the context at hand.
Replied to ๐Ÿ”– Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era by Tony Wagner and Ted Dintersmith by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
Bookmarked Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era by Tony Wagner, Ted Dintersmith (Scribner) From two leading experts in education and entrepreneurship, an urgent call for the radical re-imagining of American education so that we better equip students for the realities of the future.
Chris, not sure if you are interested, but Benjamin Doxtdator wrote what I thought was an intriguing review of Most Likely to Succeed. Thought I’d share.
Liked Work-life balance is actually a circle, according to Jeff Bezos (Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel)

All of the most awesome people I know have nothing like a work-life โ€˜balanceโ€™. Instead, they work hard, play hard, and tie that to a mission bigger than themselves.

Whether thatโ€™s true for the staff on targets in Amazon warehouses is a different matter, of course. But for knowledge workers, I think itโ€™s spot-on.