Replied to Blogging by Jim Groom (bavatuesdays)

most folks treat their blog as if it were some kind of glossy headshot of their thinking, whereas the beauty and freedom of blogging was that it was by design a networked tool. Blogging provides a space to develop an online voice, connect with a particular network, and build a sense of identity online in conjunction with others working through a similar process. Scale in many ways became a distraction, one which was magnified to such a degree by the hype around MOOCs in edtech that anything less that 10s of thousands of “users,” “learners,” “participants,” followers,” etc. was tacitly considered somehow less than optimal for effective online learning. It was, and remains, a symptom of the capital-driven ethos of Silicon Valley that places all value on scale and numbers which is rooted in monetization—a reality that has infected edtech and helped to undermine the value and importance of forging an independent voice and intimate connections through what should be an independent media of expression. When scale is the endgame the whole process becomes bogged down in page views, followers, and likes rather than the freedom to explore and experiment with your ideas online. It’s a uniquely web-based version of Hell where the dominant form of communication online is a Medium think piece written by your friendly neighborhood thought leader.

This is a useful reflection on blogging and the distraction of scale Jim. To me, this relates to Bill Ferriter’s point about audience. Lately, I have stopped sharing everything everywhere POSSE style and really returned to writing stuff on my blog.
Replied to On the mission of the IndieWeb movement by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
What you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) is fine when you’re given all the functionality and control you need or want. It’s when you have additional needs and desires than the tools allow that WYSIWYG becomes a problem. Social media WYSIWYG platforms like SnapChat, Twitter, Facebook/Instagram, et ...
I have found #IndieWeb has challenged my use of markdown, especially in regards to comments. Unless I put in all the tags and code, the links do not flow through. My qualm with HTML is typing everything from scratch. Lately, I have been writing in Markdown and then pasting it into a convertor. Wondering if you use anything different Chris or Greg to make things easier?
Listened Golden State Killer: the end of DNA privacy? Chips with Everything podcast by Jordan Erica Webber from the Guardian

US investigators recently tracked down the suspect of a 40-year-old murder case after uploading DNA to a genealogy website. Jordan Erica Webber weighs up the pros of finding ancestors with the cons of selling privacy

Jordan Erica Webber talks to Prof Charles Tumosa of the University of Baltimore, Prof Denise Syndercombe-Court of King’s College and Lee Rainie of the Pew Research Center. This is a challenging conversation and comes back to notions of ‘informed consent’.

Maggie Koerth-Baker discusses changes in data arguing that we need to stop seeing privacy as a ‘personal’ thing:

Experts say these examples show that we need to think about online privacy less as a personal issue and more as a systemic one. Our digital commons is set up to encourage companies and governments to violate your privacy. If you live in a swamp and an alligator attacks you, do you blame yourself for being a slow swimmer? Or do you blame the swamp for forcing you to hang out with alligators?

Listened TER #112 – Perspectives on Gonski 2 – 13 May 2018 from Teachers' Education Review

With the release of the “Gonski 2.0” report, there have been many conversations about just what is the ideal vision for the future of Australian education. But in considering the many recommendations included in the report, what would it even mean to implement them? And is there broad agreement that they do actually represent the best vision for the future of education in Australia?

For this special episode, we bring together 4 different perspectives on the report and its findings, including:

This is an intriguing conversation and provides a number of perspectives on Gonski from academics who has been following the topic for several years.
Bookmarked I am a data factory (and so are you) by Nicholas Carr (ROUGH TYPE)
The shift of data ownership from the private to the public sector may well succeed in reducing the economic power of Silicon Valley, but what it would also do is reinforce and indeed institutionalize Silicon Valley’s computationalist ideology, with its foundational, Taylorist belief that, at a personal and collective level, humanity can and should be optimized through better programming.
Nicholas Carr reflects on the metaphors that we use and demonstrates some of the flaws, particularly when they are used against us inadvertently. This is something brought to the for with Google’s effort to support wellbeing. As Arielle Pardes explains:

While Google says “digital wellness” is now part of the company’s ethos, not once during the Google I/O keynote did anyone mention “privacy.”

Liked If You Really Want to Change School, You Need to Change the Lens by Will Richardson (Modern Learners)

Using what’s measurable as the lens that guides your work is easier, yes. But now that the world is honoring skills and dispositions over content knowledge and other things easily measurable, it’s time to change the lens. The primary lenses for our work today must be our deeply help beliefs about learning, our deeply held commitments to our children and their well-being, our clear understanding of the opportunities and challenges of the world as it operates today, and our capacity to create new cultures and practices in our classrooms that serve all of us, adults and kids, as learners first and foremost.

If You Really Want to Change School, You Need to Change the Lens
Bookmarked An Indieweb Podcast: Episode 4 – Webmentions and Privacy by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (David Shanske)

With the GDPR regulations coming into effect in Europe May 25th, privacy seems to be on everyone’s mind. This week, we tackle what webmentions are, using them for backfeed, and the privacy implications.

This is a useful discussion of webmentions from David Shanske and Chris Aldrich. It will be interesting to see the impact of GDPR on the #IndieWeb and the web as a whole.

I still wonder the next step in regards to webmentions, such as Gen 3 and 4. Is the challenge in regards to the platforms? For example, does WordPress only allow a certain amount of support? I know that Edublogs closes a number of APIs, I am guessing this is probably related.