Replied Reclaim Video Artwork by Lauren Brumfield (labrumfield.com)
Tim had the brilliant idea to use this as part of our new splash page when someone signs up for a domain. Their newly registered domain could automatically generate on the tape when they refresh their page.
Lauren, I love the idea of having my own customised blank tape on my site, are you suggesting that you might make available an option to generate our own tape, like with Bryan’s other recent project?
Watched
On the 8th of December at The Overseas Passenger Terminal in Sydney Australia, BVN hosted its bi-annual conference – Futures Forum 2. The theme was ‘Knowledge and Ethics in the Next Machine Age’.

23:21 Larry Prusak: Knowledge and it’s Practices in the 21st Century

Prusak discusses the changes in knowledge over time and the impact that this has. This reminds me of Weinberger’s book Too Big To Know. Some quotes that stood out were:

Knowledge won’t flow without trust

and

Schools measure things they can measure even if it is not valuable

Again and again Prusak talks about going wide, getting out and meeting new people.

1:21:59 Professor Genevieve Bell: Being Human in a Digital Age

Bell points out that computing has become about the creation, circulation, curation and resistence of data. All companies are data companies now. For example, Westfield used to be a real estate company, but they are now a data company.

The problem with algorithms is that they are based on the familiar and retrospective, they do not account for wonder and serendipity.

As we design and develop standards for tomorrow, we need to think about the diversity associated with those boards and committees. If there are only white males at the table, how does this account for other perspectives.

We do want to be disconnected, even if Silicon Valley is built around being permanently connected. One of the things that we need to consider is what is means to have an analogue footprint.

Building on the discussion of data and trust, Bell makes the point:

The thing about trust is that you only get it once.

The question remains, who do we trust when our smart devices start selling our data.

In regards to the rise of the robots, our concern should be the artificial intelligence within them. One of the big problems is that robots follow rules and we don’t.

The future of technology that we need to be aspiring to develop a future where technology can support us with our art, wonder and curiosity.


A comment made during the presentation and shared after Bell had finished:

Is your current job the best place for you to make the world a better place?


2:49:51 Phillip Bernstein: The Future of Making Things: Design Practice in the Era of Connected Technology

Berstein unpacks six technical disruptions – data, computational design, simulation analysis, the internet of things, industrial construction and machine learning – and looks at the implications for architecture.

3:51:44 Dr Simon Longstaff: Ethics in the Next Machine Age

Dr Longstaff explores the ethics associated with technology. This includes the consideration of ethical design, a future vision – Athens or Eden – and the purpose to making. Discussing the technology of WWII, Longstaff states:

Technical mastery devoid of ethics is the root of all evil

He notes that just because we can, it does not mean we ought.

A collection of points to consider in regards to ethics in technology
A screenshot from Dr Longstaff

He also used two ads from AOL to contrast the choices for tomorrow:


H/T Tom Barrett

Replied Episode 95: New Year, same old TIDE by Dai Barnes & Doug Belshaw (tidepodcast.org)
Interesting listening as always. Just a couple of quick points. In regards to the distraction of technology, my mother used to bring knitting (is that technology?) when she would watch me play cricket. I remember once I had lasted only a few balls, going out for a duck. As I walked off, she congratulated me and told me that I had played well. I knew that she neither had a clue what was going on or how I had played. That was long before the smartphone.

Another wondering was associated with the discussion of different identities online. Do you think that the #IndieWeb and the correlating principles counter that, with focus on POSSE and collective identity?

Listened Digital dystopia: democracy in the internet age – podcast by Jordan Erica Webber from the Guardian
Jordan Erica Webber looks at how our data is being used to push political ideologies
Jordan Erica Webber takes a look at democracy in the digital age, an era in which social media platforms have enabled a new form of political advertising and data companies can provide those who wish to sway elections and referendums with the ability to micro-target individual voters’ private Facebook feeds. Whether this is right or wrong, is everyone forced down this path? I am reminded again of Weapons of Math Destruction
Listened The YouTube star who fought back against revenge porn and won – podcast by Jenny Kleeman from the Guardian
Four years after her ex posted explicit videos filmed without her consent, Chrissy Chambers talks about the gruelling legal battle that nearly destroyed her
Written by Jenny Kleeman, read by Kelly Burke and produced by Simon Barnard. The original text can be read here.
Bookmarked ‘Never get high on your own supply’ – why social media bosses don’t use social media by Alex Hern (the Guardian)
Developers of platforms such as Facebook have admitted that they were designed to be addictive. Should we be following the executives’ example and going cold turkey – and is it even possible for mere mortals?
Alex Hern continues his exploration of social media, this time investigating who social media executives do not actually use the spaces which they create:

I used to look at the heads of the social networks and get annoyed that they didn’t understand their own sites. Regular users encounter bugs, abuse or bad design decisions that the executives could never understand without using the sites themselves. How, I would wonder, could they build the best service possible if they didn’t use their networks like normal people? Now, I wonder something else: what do they know that we don’t?

Hern shares his efforts to remove himself:

That is certainly how I feel about Twitter. I have tried to cut back, after realising how much of my time was spent staring at a scrolling feed of aphorisms ranging from mildly amusing to vaguely traumatic. I deleted 133,000 tweets, in an effort to reduce the feeling that I couldn’t give up on something into which I had sunk so much time. I removed the apps from my phone and my computer, forcing any interaction through the web browser. I have taken repeated breaks. But I keep coming back.

He also highlights what we are up against:

It is one thing to be a child with a protective parent keeping technology away from you. It is quite another to live like a technology executive yourself, defeating the combined effort of thousands of the world’s smartest people to instil a craving to open their app every day. I am not alone in struggling.

Along with Mozilla’s podcast on overload, they provide a useful provocation to go further on the topic.

Replied Australia Day Eve Provocations (LEARN AND LEAD)
Do what’s hard. Place high expectations on yourself. Take risks. Do something that matters
Great post Greg. So much to take in as we go into the new year. The thing I was left wondering about each of the contexts were the conditions that made leadership possible in each of the scenarios. Whether it be a mandate, some sort of sacrifice or thesupport from those around us, I wondering if we also have a shared responsibility to not only lead ourselves, but also help others lead as well?
Bookmarked Fitness tracking app Strava gives away location of secret US army bases by Alex Hern (the Guardian)
Data about exercise routes shared online by soldiers can be used to pinpoint overseas facilities
Alex Hern reports that Strava data inadvertently reveals a number of supposed military secrets. In response, Bill Fitzgerald also provides some interesting commentary on Twitter:

Arvind Narayanan also wrote a series of tweets: